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Lesson Posted on 16/10/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

Some Basic Things Need To Know

Avy Guitarist

I provide Guitar classes basic to Advanced. Art drawing classes Paintings Sketch Portraits Landscapes.

In order to teach a child to hold the guitar properly, you'll need to learn to do it yourself first. Do the following: Find a straight-back, armless chair, and take a seat. Sit comfortably, keeping your back relatively straight, with your knees apart. Pick up the guitar. Rest the guitar on your right... read more

In order to teach a child to hold the guitar properly, you'll need to learn to do it yourself first. Do the following:

  • Find a straight-back, armless chair, and take a seat. Sit comfortably, keeping your back relatively straight, with your knees apart.
  • Pick up the guitar. Rest the guitar on your right thigh.
  • Pull the body of the guitar flat against your stomach.
  • Hold the guitar so that the neck runs roughly parallel to the floor.
  • Your upper right arm should rest against the top of the guitar, causing your right hand to naturally align over the sound hole of the instrument.
  • Grab the neck of the guitar with your left hand. You should position your thumb behind the neck, with your fingers positioned loosely over the fretboard.

Once you're comfortable holding the guitar yourself, you'll want to try and teach a child to hold the instrument properly. From experience, I can tell you this can feel like a losing proposition within minutes they'll be holding the guitar flat in their lap. Remind them of proper posture occasionally, but not constantly. Remember the initial goal here is to teach them to enjoy the guitar. Over time, as the music they try to play gets more challenging, most kids will naturally begin holding the guitar properly.

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Lesson Posted on 18/10/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

10 Ways To Improve Your Classical Guitar Playing

Mithun Taksande

I have been playing with a band called "Abattoir" for 10 years and have performed at various events...

One of the most frustrating aspects of playing guitar is when you reach the point where you are not improving. Whether you are a novice or a seasoned musician, we all face the same problem and ask the question, "Why am I not at the level I want to be and how can I get there?" Top 10 tips for success: Let's... read more
One of the most frustrating aspects of playing guitar is when you reach the point where you are not improving. Whether you are a novice or a seasoned musician, we all face the same problem and ask the question, "Why am I not at the level I want to be and how can I get there?"
Top 10 tips for success:
Let's get started with the top ten things you can do to obtain maximum results as a guitarist.
1. Learn something new:
Educating yourself is the first step to becoming a better guitarist. Whether you choose to believe it or not, there's always something new to learn and master. If you are currently studying music in a conservatory, at school, or in college, you will find that learning will come more easier to you. If not, I highly recommend that you get in a program. While I believe in teaching yourself, I also know from first hand experience that motivation and encouragement from a teacher is priceless. Once you conquer the subject that you were learning, push yourself to learn something that you're not quite comfortable with. Learning within your comfort zone often results with you running around in circles.
2. Make your time count:
Practicing does not make perfect, it makes permanent. That makes the time you spend playing your guitar all the more important. Don't waste your time fiddling around on your guitar. Dig in and learn something that will aid you on your quest for musical success. Set goals and work towards achieving them. Whether it's technique, tricks, or a new song, you can become better just by using your time more wisely.
3. Listen to more music:
The more music that you are exposed to, the better guitarist you will become. Listen to the bands that you enjoy most and draw inspiration from them. Take note of what the musicians are doing in their songs and make a list of the techniques you want to learn. This can be the motivating force that gets you to play your guitar more often.
4. Surround yourself with excellence:
When you play your guitar with people who are better guitarists, you not only learn from them but feel motivated to push yourself to keep up. At first this idea seems obscure. Why would you expose yourself to that kind of stress? Let's face it, if there's one thing that will make you get motivated quickly it's the fact that people are counting on you. Don't play with musicians who are arrogant and rude. Embarrassment doesn't foster self-esteem and will only get you down. The people you want to learn from are patient and understanding. Eventually you will find yourself at their level. It happens faster than you might think.
5. Ask yourself what will you do when you obtain the skills you want:
What do you want to do with what you learn? Perhaps you want to make a CD or join a band and play at some local venues. Start planning for it now and use what you currently have. This ties into setting goals but is not to be underestimated. Knowing how you want to use your talent is important. Create a vision and use goals to act on it. Whether you want to play for others, or to the wall in your bedroom, the choice is yours.
6. Teach someone how to play guitar:
To teach is to learn. If the only chord you know how to play is a G chord, show someone that. Why? Because it reaffirms what you know and solidifies your knowledge. I can tell you from personal experience that I have learned more through teaching than I ever learned through being taught. It forces you out of your comfort zone and when questions are asked, you need to know the answer. I'm a firm believer that anyone can teach someone something if they want to. Give it a shot and see the results for yourself.
7. Believe in your ability:
Yes, I know how cliché this sounds. However, you need to hear it. You can do anything you put your mind to and if you choose to play guitar well, chubby fingers or not, you can! Don't listen to what others say and be true to yourself. This can be hard seeing as we live in a critical society that doesn't realize how much words can hurt. Keep at it and surround yourself with supportive people. More of a life lesson than a guitar lesson, but as far as I'm concerned music is intertwined with daily living.
8. You are incomparable:
In case you haven't picked up the hint yet, you are the ultimate guitarist. There is no one like you and there will never be anyone who even comes remotely close to being like you. Integrate who you are into your music and you will never have a shortage of material. Your music will soon form into your own tone and style.
9. Learn what worked for others:
Whether you research your favorite guitarist or talk to your guitar teacher, ask others what worked for them. I don't claim to know all the answers but when everyone puts their heads together, some really neat ideas start to flow. Networking allows you to give and receive at the same time.
10. Crush your weakness:
We all know where we lack the most in the guitar realm. For me it's in technique and finger picking, for others it's something different. Whatever it is, don't ignore it while enjoying your recent victory. Keep attacking your weak points and you'll soon see improvement. The secret is that you never stop seeing problems and you continually get better over time. You'll never be stuck without something to do. Take out a sheet of paper and write them down. Then find the resources you need to help you destroy them. It's not unlike a war, but in the end you always win.
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Lesson Posted on 18/10/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar/Jazz & Blues

F Blues Licks

Mithun Taksande

I have been playing with a band called "Abattoir" for 10 years and have performed at various events...

F Blues Licks: In this free blues guitar lesson we will learn several licks that we can play over a chord progression in F. This lesson is going give you several licks to play over this chord progression. These licks don't stay within one scale, but switch between Major and Minor Pentatonic as well... read more

F Blues Licks:

In this free blues guitar lesson we will learn several licks that we can play over a chord progression in F. This lesson is going give you several licks to play over this chord progression. These licks don't stay within one scale, but switch between Major and Minor Pentatonic as well as the blues scale. There are many ways to approach understanding these licks.

Let's start by reviewing a few scales. Let's take a look at the Fm Pentatonic Scale 1st Position:


Now let's look at the 2 position of the Fm Pentatonic Scale


And here is the F Blues Scale


Now let's use these scales to create some licks. Here is Lick #1:


The next lick uses the second position of the Fm Pentatonic scale.


Our last lick uses a mix of the Major, Minor Pentatonic, and Blues Scales

Now some adaptations from a few of the best in Blues.

This lesson teaches you a blues guitar lick in the Mississippi Delta style. We'll cover how to play this lick in detail and focus on a couple of techniques used.

Here is the tab for our Muddy Waters style lick:

Here is the tab for B.B. King Style Lick.

Here is the tab for Robben Ford Style Lick:

Here is the tab for our Johnny Winter Style guitar lick:

Here is the tab Eric Clapton Style Lick:

eric clapton guitar lick tab

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Answered on 11/12/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

Vinit Kulkarni

Guitar Teacher

U must best sound guitar and international guitar made in China. It's best for beginner
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Lesson Posted on 25/08/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

Finger Practice

Vinit Kulkarni

I am learning with teaching guitar last 14 year's. Kid's and age 60 I will teaching guitar. And wanna...

6/0 6/1 6/2 6/3 6/4 ↓ Down Stroke 5/0 5/1 5/2 5/3 5/4 4/0 4/1 4/2 4/3 4/5 3/0 3/1 3/2 3/3 3/4 2/0 2/1 2/2 2/3 2/4 1/0 1/1 1/2 1/3 1/4 Same as ↑ up stroke on string after play start 1/4 1/3 1/3 1/1 1/0
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Lesson Posted on 19/08/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

10 Tips To Learn How To Play The Guitar With Good Technique

Himanshu Kumar

1. Avoid The Left-Hand Death Grip: When you first start playing, straight away you’ll discover that pressing the strings against the fret board is hard work, hurts your fingers and makes your wrist ache. The natural way to combat this is by hooking your thumb over the top of the fret board to... read more

1. Avoid The Left-Hand Death Grip:

When you first start playing, straight away you’ll discover that pressing the strings against the fret board is hard work, hurts your fingers and makes your wrist ache. The natural way to combat this is by hooking your thumb over the top of the fret board to get leverage, which inadvertently causes you to press the strings more with the flat pad of your finger (where your fingerprint is) rather than the actual fingertip.


                                              how-to-play-the-guitar

This is sometimes called the “death grip”, because you do end up with a fairly fierce grip on your neck and it restricts the reach of your fingers. The proper technique is to have your thumb on the back of the guitar’s neck. This forces your hand to use the fingertips, which is far better and more accurate when it comes to playing just the notes you want without accidentally muting adjacent strings. The trouble is it feels kind of weird and difficult at first, and your wrist will lack strength. Stick with it and you’ll appreciate the benefits further down the track. Remember, thumb on the back of the neck.

2. Rehearse Standing Up And Sitting Down:

         how-to-play-the-guitar                                how-to-play-the-guitar

Okay, things are hard enough as it is without expecting you to waltz around the room while you’re playing. The important thing is, if you’re going to take this dream all the way, one day you’ll be standing up in front of crowd. Playing with your guitar slung across your shoulder is a very different posture to sitting down.

On a chair, you tend to hunch over and try to see what your hands are doing (another bad habit you want to avoid). Then, when you’re standing up, everything changes. Try it and you’ll see what I mean. You’ll find it much harder to see your left hand, for a start. Make sure you have a good guitar strap, adjust it to a comfortable length (forget slinging it down around your knees looks cool, but it’s a crap playing position) and regularly practice playing while you’re standing up.

3. No Need For Speed:

                                          10-tips-technique-how-to-play-the-guitar

Don’t ever bother trying to learn how to play fast. Really, don’t do it. Good technique is about accurate fingering and hitting the right notes every time, especially when it comes to scales and playing tricky bar chords. Concentrate on precise fingering. The truth is, learn to play properly and speed will happen all by itself. The biggest obstacle to fast playing is poor technique. Learn good technique and fast fingering will be a chucked-in-for-free bonus. Always take your time and play slowly.

4. Always Use Correct Fingering:

how-to-play-the-guitar

Over the centuries of guitar playing the experts have long figured out the best way to play certain chords and scales, meaning which fingers should be playing certain notes on the fret board.

Occasionally, you might discover an easier way of playing these, you’re a musical genius and never knew it. Don’t be tempted. Correct fingering isn’t just about playing that chord or scale properly. Adding variations is considered too, such as sevenths and ninths, and your custom style of fingering a chord might prove that those variations can’t be played (yep, this is one of the things I learned the hard way). Pay careful attention to the correct fingering of a chord and your hand’s position on the fret board for scales. 

5. Silent Rehearsing:

You want to watch your favourite TV show when you’re supposed to be rehearsing? Don’t panic, a lot can be achieved by holding your guitar and constantly swapping from one chord to another or playing scales without plucking the strings with your right hand. What you’re doing is still training your left hand to play it’s all solid practice. Good technique is locked-in habits when you’re playing. With your thumb on the back of the neck, remember?

6. Use A Metronome!:

                                             how-to-play-the-guitar

Playing to a click track is really hard at first, but the advantages later on are immeasurable. Your sense of rhythm and timing will get an early boost, if you try using a metronome soon in your career. However, don’t stress about it too much and make sure you set the beats-per-minute (BPM) to something very slow. The idea is to get used to playing in time and at a steady tempo, but don’t rush this at the expense of learning technique. By the way, you’ll find heaps of metronome apps on the internet.

7. Don’t Shy Away From Difficult Chords:

                                                  how-to-play-the-guitar

A few weeks ago in my studio, I was recording a friend called Mary, a singer-guitarist, who would move heaven and earth to avoid playing a B minor chord. She found the fingering too difficult and used capos and all manner of transpositions to dodge the dreaded bar chord. If anything, you should seek out these difficult bits and spend more time and energy on perfecting tricky chords, otherwise, you’ll find them a mental barrier to your playing for the rest of your days.

8. Be Disciplined With Your Practice:

                                                    how-to-play-the-guitar

Nothing beats regularly putting your hands on the guitar and practicing the latest lessons. Even if it’s just for ten minutes on a day when you’re otherwise too busy. Good technique comes from your mind and your fingers remembering how it’s all supposed to work, particularly when it comes to those tricky fingerings. Try to set aside some time every day and develop good playing habits. It’ll also help to build up those calluses on your fingertips.

9. Give Yourself A Break and Listen to Music:

                                          10-tips-technique-how-to-play-the-guitar

The other side of the equation is not to push yourself too hard in the beginning. When your muscles start to creak and the fingertips are stinging, take a break and relax for a while. You can easily strain something and do damage to tendons and ligaments if you ignore the danger signs that you need a rest.

10. Don’t Forget Your Right Hand Practice:

                          10-tips-technique-how-to-play-the-guitar

Sometimes it’s good to simply mute the strings with your left hand and practise creating a percussive rhythm with your right-hand strumming. Uberchord app also features a strummer trainer to improve your rhythm and timings.

Alternatively, choose an easy chord (or no chord at all) and focus for a while on any finger-picking and plectrum style that you’re learning. The point is that your right-hand technique is often ignored in the effort to get those fingers on your left hand doing the correct thing. Don’t forget that learning how to play the guitar is a two-handed deal.

There you have it. Like I said earlier, a lot of these tips are obvious and common sense, but many new players still make simple mistakes in their enthusiasm to begin playing exciting stuff. Get the basics right, the proper technique happening from the very beginning when learning how to play the guitar, and you can be a great player rather than just a good one.

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Answered on 11/08/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

SoundMonk School Of Music

you can go to Soundmonk Store at Andheri Juhu or Bandra and know better
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Answered on 11/12/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

Vinit Kulkarni

Guitar Teacher

Search Urbanpro and my private tutor
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Lesson Posted on 11/07/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

Tips For Playing Guitar

Trishan School Of Music Art And Dance

Trishan Music Academy brings a distinctive and modern approach to music education in India. Our curriculum...

Tips for playing: To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first,... read more

Tips for playing:

  1. To get good touch in your strumming hand, it’ll take longer than 10 hours. It’s about reps. Try to consider the amount of finesse you are hitting the strings with. Do a little research on palm mutting and other useful strumming techniques. If it sounds nasty at first, that’s cool. Your fingers and wrists will start to adjust. Focus on getting quality sounds out of the guitar.

  2. With your left hand, fret the strings as close to the frets as possible. This will reduce buzzing and the chords will ring clearer.

  3. You’ll need to press the strings down firmly to ensure they ring out well. One of the toughest parts for beginners is ensuring you aren’t “muting” the strings that you aren’t fretting (credit natasha at www.dresshead.com). These small touches get programmed in to your fingers after hours of time, so don’t worry too much about it. Just focus on getting the best sound out of your guitar.

  4. Your fingers will hurt, don’t worry about it too much.

  5. It’ll feel weird for the first few days. This is normal. At the beginning a G chord feels like it was purpose designed to give you wrist cramps, after a month of playing the guitar it’ll feel like coming home.

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Answered on 27/01/2017 Music/Instrumental Music/Guitar

Amit Joshi

Guitar Instructor

First of all, it totally depends on your practice and how much time you dedicate to the instrument and second, if you do so properly, then I can complete basic guitar syllabus in 3 months.
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