Popular Localities

Bangalore

Delhi

Noida

Gurgaon

Mumbai

Hyderabad

Kolkata

Chennai

Pune

Ahmedabad

Chandigarh

Online Services

Student Enquiries

Jobs

loading......

coming soon

Coming Soon

We are in process of building the inventory of good professionals in this category

Got it!
BSc Tuition

BSc Tuition

+ Follow 29,995 Followers

Share

Showing 26 to 50 of 100
Sort By: 
S

Seemi 20 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What are the general characteristics of nuclear forces

0 0 3

Show previous answers

Dr Rajni replied | 24 Jun

The isospin of the nucleon and the isospin symmetry (charge independence) of nuclear forces arises from a corresponding symmetry in the quarks from whichnucleons are made. The main fermion (spin 1/2) constituents of the proton and the neutron are the so-called u and d quarks.

0 0

Dr Sushil Kumar replied | 26 Aug

visit http://www.apniphysics.com for physics video lectures..........

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

R

Ravichander 20 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is peristalsis?

0 0 3

Show previous answers

Wanchha replied | 22 Jun

It is the type of movement of Music le in the oesophagus that help the food to table down.

0 0

Sakina Aamir replied | 24 Jun

It is the involuntary contractions and relaxations of muscles around the intestine, which help the food to go down.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

B

Bala 20 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is marasmus?

0 0

Selvakumar replied | 20 Apr

Disease loss of wight skin attached bone

0 0
M

Mehmubeen replied | 17 Jun

Marasmus is a malnutrition occurring in small children, because of insufficient intake of protein and calories.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

A

Arunsundar 18 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is Type B Hepatitis?

5 5

Educa replied | 27 Apr

Hepatitis B is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) which affects the liver. It can cause both acute and chronic infections. Many people have no symptoms during the initial infection.

0 0

Aditi replied | 21 Jun

It is an infectious disease, which can have serious damage to your organ system effecting the liver initially. But hopefully now we have Hepatitis B vaccines available.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

N

Neeta 19 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is Varicella?

1 0 4

Show previous answers

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

Varicella (chickenpox) is an acute infectious disease caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). The recurrent infection (herpes zoster, also known as shingles) has been recognized since ancient times. Varicella Zoster Virus VZV is a DNA virus and is a member of the herpesvirus group. VZV enters through the respiratory tract and conjunctiva. The incubation period is 14 to 16 days after...  more»
Varicella (chickenpox) is an acute infectious disease caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). The recurrent infection (herpes zoster, also known as shingles) has been recognized since ancient times. Varicella Zoster Virus VZV is a DNA virus and is a member of the herpesvirus group. VZV enters through the respiratory tract and conjunctiva. The incubation period is 14 to 16 days after exposure, with a range of 10 to 21 days.

Vaccines :
1. Varicella vaccine (Varivax) -- approved for persons 12 months and older
2. Measles-mumps-rubellavaricella vaccine (ProQuad) -- approved for children 12 months through 12 years
3. Herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax) -- approved for persons 50 years and older «less

0 0

Dr. Anshu replied | 02 May

chicken pox

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

A

Arumugam 19 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Can you explain what is Kirby-Bauer test?

0 0

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

Kirby–Bauer antibiotic testing (KB testing or disc diffusion antibiotic sensitivity testing) is a test which uses antibiotic-impregnated wafers to test whether bacteria are affected by antibiotics.

0 0

Wilfred replied | 03 May

Kirby bauer test is an anti biotic test by impregnating antibiotic coated wafer to bacteria solution to test the effectiveness of anti biotics.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

C

Chinmayee 19 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is Laboratory diagnosis of diphtheria?

0 0

U.k. replied | 01 May

Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of diphtheria :
1.The guidelines present current recommendations for the microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by
potentially toxicgenic isolates of corynebacteria, withparticular reference to Corynebacterium diphtheriae and C.ulcerans
.They cover the following main areas:
laboratory safety issues
the...  more»
Guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of diphtheria :
1.The guidelines present current recommendations for the microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by
potentially toxicgenic isolates of corynebacteria, withparticular reference to Corynebacterium diphtheriae and C.ulcerans
.They cover the following main areas:
ï laboratory safety issues
ï the role of the diagnostic laboratory
ï the role of, and interaction with, the reference laboratory
ï procedures for presumptive identification of
C.diphtheriae and C.ulcerans
ï importance of toxicgenicity testing
ï laboratory responsibility for reporting toxigenic
C.diphtheriae, C. ulcerans, and C. pseudotuberculosis
ï susceptibility testing of coryneform bacteria
ï serological immunity testing
ï specialised testing; molecular typing
ï enhancing microbiological surveillance «less

0 0

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

Diphtheria is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheria. Doctors usually decide if a person has diphtheria by looking for common signs and symptoms. They can use a swab from the back of the throat and test it for the bacteria that cause diphtheria. A doctor can also take a sample from a skin lesion (like a sore) and try and grow the bacteria to be sure a patient...  more»
Diphtheria is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheria. Doctors usually decide if a person has diphtheria by looking for common signs and symptoms. They can use a swab from the back of the throat and test it for the bacteria that cause diphtheria. A doctor can also take a sample from a skin lesion (like a sore) and try and grow the bacteria to be sure a patient has diphtheria.
Laboratory Diagnosis
1.Isolation of Corynebacterium diphtheriae from a gram stain or throat culture from a clinical specimen.
2.Histopathologic diagnosis of diphtheria by a stain called "Albert's Stain". «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

V

Varsha 19 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Explain Rickettsial diseases.

0 0

U.k. replied | 30 Apr

Rickettsial disease encompasses a group of diseases caused by the microorganisms rickettsiae.

Rickettsiae occupy a position between bacteria and viruses. They can only survive inside cells. Rickettsial diseases vary considerably in severity from self-limiting mild illnesses to severe life-threatening infections, particularly if complications arise. The organisms cause...  more»
Rickettsial disease encompasses a group of diseases caused by the microorganisms rickettsiae.

Rickettsiae occupy a position between bacteria and viruses. They can only survive inside cells. Rickettsial diseases vary considerably in severity from self-limiting mild illnesses to severe life-threatening infections, particularly if complications arise. The organisms cause disease by damaging blood vessels in various tissues and organs. In severe cases multiple tissues and organs are affected. «less

0 0

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

Rickettsia is a genus of nonmotile, gram-negative, nonspore-forming, highly pleomorphic bacteria that can present as cocci. These are obligate intracellular parasites.Rickettsia species are transmitted by numerous types of arthropod, including chigger, ticks, fleas, and lice, and are associated with both human and plant disease. Most notably, Rickettsia species are the pathogen...  more»
Rickettsia is a genus of nonmotile, gram-negative, nonspore-forming, highly pleomorphic bacteria that can present as cocci. These are obligate intracellular parasites.Rickettsia species are transmitted by numerous types of arthropod, including chigger, ticks, fleas, and lice, and are associated with both human and plant disease. Most notably, Rickettsia species are the pathogen responsible for: typhus, rickettsialpox, Boutonneuse fever,etc. Rickettsia bacteria do not cause rickets, which is a result of vitamin D deficiency.The majority of Rickettsia bacteria are susceptible to antibiotics of the tetracycline group. «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

A

Anu 19 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is Filariasis?

0 0
D

Dr. Shajila replied | 19 Apr

Filariasis is an infection caused by filarial worms in the blood and lymph channels,lymph glands and other tissues.It is a parasitic disease transmitted by blood feeding arthropods.Most cases caused by the parasite known as Wuchereria Bancrofti.

0 0
S

Sushma replied | 21 Jun

Its a parasitic disease caused by an infection with roundworms of the Filarioidea type.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

S

Shaun 18 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Which is the receptor host cell in HIV infection?

0 0 3

Show previous answers

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

HIV enters macrophages and CD4-positive T cells (CD4 is a glycoprotein receptor found on cells) by the adsorption of glycoproteins on its surface to receptors on the target cell, followed by fusion of the viral envelope with the cell membrane and the release of the HIV capsid into the cell .Two glycoproteins make up env and these protrude from the virion. The cap of the protein...  more»
HIV enters macrophages and CD4-positive T cells (CD4 is a glycoprotein receptor found on cells) by the adsorption of glycoproteins on its surface to receptors on the target cell, followed by fusion of the viral envelope with the cell membrane and the release of the HIV capsid into the cell .Two glycoproteins make up env and these protrude from the virion. The cap of the protein is called gp120 and the stem is gp41. For HIV to enter a host cell, it must first use gp120 to attach to a CD4 receptor. The CD4 receptor is found on CD4 T-cells and macrophages. «less

0 0

Dr. Anshu replied | 02 May

CD4

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

K

Kadar 18 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Name a pathogenic yeast-like fungi.

0 0

U.k. replied | 30 Apr

Pathogenic fungi are fungi that cause disease in humans or other organisms. The study of pathogenic fungi is referred to as "medical mycology." Fungicides such as ziram are used to protect plants against fungal infections

0 0

Abhishek Singh replied | 29 Jun

Candida

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

S

Siraj 18 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Which is the famous serological test for the diagnosis of Enteric Fever?

0 0

U.k. replied | 30 Apr

the laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever is dependent upon either the isolation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhi from a clinical sample or the detection of raised titers of agglutinating serum antibodies against the lipopolysaccharide or flagellum antigens of serotype Typhi. In this study, the serum antibody responses to the LPS and flagellum antigens of serotype...  more»
the laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever is dependent upon either the isolation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhi from a clinical sample or the detection of raised titers of agglutinating serum antibodies against the lipopolysaccharide or flagellum antigens of serotype Typhi. In this study, the serum antibody responses to the LPS and flagellum antigens of serotype Typhi were investigated with individuals from a region of Vietnam in which typhoid is endemic, and their usefulness for the diagnosis of typhoid fever was evaluated. «less

0 0

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

The diagnosis of enteric fever ( typhoid fever) is primarily clinical.Specific serologic tests
Assays that identify Salmonella antibodies or antigens support the diagnosis of typhoid fever, but these results should be confirmed with cultures or DNA evidence.

The Widal test was the mainstay of typhoid fever diagnosis for decades. It is used to measure agglutinating...  more»
The diagnosis of enteric fever ( typhoid fever) is primarily clinical.Specific serologic tests
Assays that identify Salmonella antibodies or antigens support the diagnosis of typhoid fever, but these results should be confirmed with cultures or DNA evidence.

The Widal test was the mainstay of typhoid fever diagnosis for decades. It is used to measure agglutinating antibodies against H and O antigens of S typhi. Neither sensitive nor specific, the Widal test is no longer an acceptable clinical method. «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

M

Musahid 18 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is Subcutaneous mycoses?

0 0

U.k. replied | 01 May

Subcutaneous mycoses, which are much less common than superficial fungal infections, are characterized by a heterogeneous group of infections that often result from direct penetration of the fungus into the dermis and subcutaneous tissue through traumatic injury.

0 0

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

Subcutaneous Mycoses are chronic, localized infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue following the traumatic implantation of the aetiologic agent. The causative fungi are all soil saprophytes of regional epidemiology whose ability to adapt to the tissue environment and elicit disease is extremely variable.These are characterized by a heterogeneous group of infections that...  more»
Subcutaneous Mycoses are chronic, localized infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue following the traumatic implantation of the aetiologic agent. The causative fungi are all soil saprophytes of regional epidemiology whose ability to adapt to the tissue environment and elicit disease is extremely variable.These are characterized by a heterogeneous group of infections that often result from direct penetration of the fungus into the dermis and subcutaneous tissue through traumatic injury. «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

T

Taj 17 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Name a fungus infection of hair.

0 0 3

Show previous answers

Jayasimha replied | 01 May

Tinea capitis (also known as "Herpes tonsurans", "Ringworm of the hair," "Ringworm of the scalp," "Scalp ringworm", and "Tinea tonsurans") is a superficial fungal infection (dermatophytosis) of the scalp. The disease is primarily caused by dermatophytes in the Trichophyton and Microsporum genera that invade the hair shaft. The clinical presentation is typically single or multiple...  more»
Tinea capitis (also known as "Herpes tonsurans", "Ringworm of the hair," "Ringworm of the scalp," "Scalp ringworm", and "Tinea tonsurans") is a superficial fungal infection (dermatophytosis) of the scalp. The disease is primarily caused by dermatophytes in the Trichophyton and Microsporum genera that invade the hair shaft. The clinical presentation is typically single or multiple patches of hair loss, sometimes with a 'black dot' pattern (often with broken-off hairs), that may be accompanied by inflammation, scaling, pustules, and itching. Uncommon in adults, tinea capitis is predominantly seen in pre-pubertal children, more often boys than girls «less

0 0

Dr. Anshu replied | 02 May

ringworm

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

K

Kamal 17 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is Gabrial phthalimide synthasis?

0 0

Kavi replied | 17 Apr

synthesis of primary amines frompthalamide and ammonia

0 0

Krishna replied | 12 Jul

Synthesis of aliphatic primary amines by using Phthalimide...

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

S

Seemi 17 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Discuss the characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels.

0 0

Neetu replied | 12 Jun

a hydrocarbon is an organic compound consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon.There are important properties of hydrocarbon fuels that need to be understood and
considered to improve safety in upstream oil and gas operations. These include:
Flammability Limits
Auto-ignition Temperature
Minimum Ignition Energy
Other Considerations

0 0

Krishna replied | 12 Jul

Its an organic compound which gives high calorific value so that effective heating is achieved.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

H

Harish 17 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What are viscosity reducers? Give examples?

0 0

Neetu replied | 11 Jun

Reduced viscosity is equal to the ratio of the relative viscosity increment ( {\displaystyle \eta _{i}} ) to the mass concentration of the polyme

0 0

Manjeet Singh replied | 09 Jul

viscosity reducers a dramatic decrease in apparent viscosity, it decrease the surface tension and density of liquid.
ex:Aromatic Polyisobutylene Succinimides as Viscosity Reducers with Asphaltene Dispersion Capability for Heavy and Extra-Heavy Crude Oils.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

Y

Y 17 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What is the effect of sulphur compounds in petroleum products?

0 0

Tamal replied | 08 Jun

Sulfur compounds in petroleum can produce various harmful effects including air pollution, metal corrosion and catalyst degradation. It can create armful combination like Sulphur dioxide (SO2), Hydrogen Sulphide(H2S) etc. Sulfur concentration in crude oil and high-sulfur fuels is therefore monitored or controlled in refinery and production processes within the petroleum industry.

0 0

Dushyant Kumar replied | 09 Jul

It forms oxides of sulphur like So2, So3

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

S

Sriram 16 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Why is barium precipitated as BaSO4 in hot?

1 1 3

Show previous answers

Nishant replied | 19 Jun

Due to higher atomic mass

0 0

Sangita Yadav replied | 23 Jun

Ba is precipitated as BaSo4 because BaSo4 is most stable as compare Baco3,Bacro4,Bac2o4 and Baso4 is insoluble in dil. HCL.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

S

Sonia 16 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Can you explain Hofmann bromamide reaction?

1 0

Zahid replied | 09 Jun

It is a reaction for the synthesis of primary amine.
When an amide is treated with bromine in an aqueous or ethanolic (of alcohol) solution of sodium hydroxide, degradation of amide takes place leading to the formation of primary amine. This reaction involving degradation of amide and is popularly known as Hoffmann bromamide degradation reaction. The primary amine thus formed...  more»
It is a reaction for the synthesis of primary amine.
When an amide is treated with bromine in an aqueous or ethanolic (of alcohol) solution of sodium hydroxide, degradation of amide takes place leading to the formation of primary amine. This reaction involving degradation of amide and is popularly known as Hoffmann bromamide degradation reaction. The primary amine thus formed contains one carbon less than the number of carbon atoms in that amide.

RCONH2 +Br2 + 4NaOH R-NH2 + Na2CO3 + 2NaBr + 2H2O «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

A

Abhishek 16 Apr in  BSc Tuition

How is citric acid prepared? Give its important properties and uses.

0 0

Aditi replied | 21 Jun

citric acid naturally occurs in fruits like orange and lemon etc.

0 0
P

Pallavi replied | 21 Jun

citric acid C6H8O7
2 HYDROPROPANE-1,2,3TRICARBOXYLIC ACID
It has three carboxyl or -COOH group


PROPERTIES OF CITRIC ACID:-
Citric acid is the intermediate product of the plants of a natural composition and physiological metabolism, is also one of the organic acids widely used in the field of food, medicine, chemical industry. It is colorless transparent...  more»
citric acid C6H8O7
2 HYDROPROPANE-1,2,3TRICARBOXYLIC ACID
It has three carboxyl or -COOH group


PROPERTIES OF CITRIC ACID:-
Citric acid is the intermediate product of the plants of a natural composition and physiological metabolism, is also one of the organic acids widely used in the field of food, medicine, chemical industry. It is colorless transparent or translucent crystal, or granular, particle powder, odorless, although has strong sour, but a pleasant, slightly astringent taste. In the warm air gradually disintegrate, in the humid air, it is slight deliquescence.
(1) Reaction with Acid
Citric acid and fuming sulfuric acid mixed, at room temperature, which produce aconitic acid, slightly heating can generate 3 - ketoglutarate. The mixture of citric acid and concentrated sulfuric acid, temperature at 40? into acetone and CO2, CO, etc.; when heated to 150? to generate aconitic acid anhydride; generate double Kang acid (diconic acid) C9H10O6 and CO heating to 200 ?, CO2 and so on.
When the sulfate concentration is less than 94%, generating 3- ketoglutaric acid at low temperature; when the sulfate concentration is less than 60%, when heated to generate aconitic acid.
Anhydrous citric acid and 1 portions of nitric acid and 2 copies of the action of sulphuric acid form nitric acid ester C3H5 (ONO2) (COOH)3, it does not dissolve in ether, and barium and lead combine to form insoluble salts.
(2) Reaction with Alkali
The citric acid is fused with K2CO3 or KOH or nitric acid to obtain oxalic acid and acetic acid or other salts.
Citric acid and sodium salt (such as NaCl) lime carbonization to yield acetone.
Citric acid is get boiling in alkaline solution to obtain acrylic acid (C3H4O2).
The conventional acid base neutralization reaction of citric acid can produce various kinds of salts.
(3) the effect of Glycerol
Citric acid and glycerol mixed by dry distillation to obtain acetone, CO, CO2 and glycerol in the ether acetone acid ester.
The mixture of citric acid and glycerol are heated to 100 ?, and generate citric acid ester of glycerol , which is substance like glass. If large amount of glycerol and heated to 170? to get citronella diglycerol( citrodiglycerin C12H18O11).
Citric acid and glycerin which is according to the molar ratio of 1:3 heat can be citric acid glyceride. With different molar ratio of which can obtain different properties of resinous substance, and some were gel or solid form, some do not dissolve in water, some solution in water. If tung oil or oil and stearic acid are heated to 100?, can shrink synthetic resinous substance, it is used as paint and plastics additives or special solvent.

USES:-
1. Food Industries
2.Metal Purification
3. Used as a reagent
4.Ideal substitute for phosphate «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

A

A.mohamed 16 Apr in  BSc Tuition

How will you distinguish between primary, secondary and tertiary amines?

0 0

U.k. replied | 03 May

1.) TEST :
Action of CHCl3 and alcoholic KOH. (Carbylamine test)

Primary Amine : Bad smelling carbylamine (Isocyanide) is formed.
Secandary Amine: No action.
Tertiary Amine : No action.

2.) TEST :
Action of CS2 and HgCl2. (Mustard oil test)

Primary Amine : Alkyl isothiocyanate is formed which has pungent smell like mustard oil.
Secandary...  more»
1.) TEST :
Action of CHCl3 and alcoholic KOH. (Carbylamine test)

Primary Amine : Bad smelling carbylamine (Isocyanide) is formed.
Secandary Amine: No action.
Tertiary Amine : No action.

2.) TEST :
Action of CS2 and HgCl2. (Mustard oil test)

Primary Amine : Alkyl isothiocyanate is formed which has pungent smell like mustard oil.
Secandary Amine : No action.
Tertiary Amine : No action

3.) TEST :
Action of Hinsberg's reagent.

Primary Amine : Monoalkyl sulphonamide is formed which is soluble in KOH.
Secandary Amine : Dialkyl sulphonamide is formed which is insoluble in KOH.
Tertiary Amine : No action. «less

0 0

Tushar replied | 09 Jul

The basic difference is,l of number of alkyl group attached to central atom... In the case of primery Amines only one Alkyl group is attached to the central atom. In the case of secondary Amines there are two Alkyl groups attached to central atom, for tertiary its 3. That's the simplest way to understand primery secondary and tertiary structure of not only Amines but also in the...  more»
The basic difference is,l of number of alkyl group attached to central atom... In the case of primery Amines only one Alkyl group is attached to the central atom. In the case of secondary Amines there are two Alkyl groups attached to central atom, for tertiary its 3. That's the simplest way to understand primery secondary and tertiary structure of not only Amines but also in the case of HALO-ALKANES , ALCOHOL, PHENOLS, AND OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS. Thanks. «less

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

K

K 15 Apr in  BSc Tuition

Show previous answers

Himanshu replied | 22 Jun

Roasting is a step of the processing of certain ores. More specifically, roasting is a metallurgical process involving gas–solid reactions at elevated temperatures with the goal of purifying the metal component(s).

0 0

Sangita Yadav replied | 23 Jun

roasting is a process in metallurgy. when a sulfide ore is heated in air by roasting process may convert to a free meta l oxide or to a free metal.
like example:- roasting ZnS may yeild Zno and roasting HgS may yeild free Hg metal.

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

S

Swati 15 Apr in  BSc Tuition

What are glycols? How is ethylene glycol prepared?

0 0

Farhana replied | 15 Apr

in the molecule of a glycol, two hydroxyl (?OH) groups are attached to different carbon atoms. Ethylene glycol is the simplest member of the class.The IUPAC name: ethane-1,2-diol. Ethylene glycol is actually produced from ethene.ethane is coverted to Ethylene oxide and produce ethyl alcohol with the help of catalysts

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

B

Balaji 15 Apr in  BSc Tuition

How will you distinguish between Phenol and Benzyl alcohol?

0 0

Bappaditya replied | 12 Jun

By FeCl3 test you scan distinguish these two..as well by Lucas reagent test also you can distinguish...

0 0

Answer

You can add upto 6 Images

Previous1234Next

About UrbanPro

UrbanPro.com helps you to connect with the best BSc Tuition in India. Post Your Requirement today and get connected.

Have a Question?

Thousands of expert tutors are available to answer your question

Looking for BSc Tuition ?

Find best BSc Tuition in your locality on UrbanPro.

FIND NOW

Do you offer BSc Tuition ?

Create Free Profile Now »

Top Contributors

U.k.

42 Answers

Jayasimha

13 Answers

Manoj Kumar

12 Answers

Neetu

10 Answers

Mamata

8 Answers

Kavitha

8 Answers

Dr. Anshu

7 Answers

Dr

7 Answers

Lakshmi

7 Answers

Sponsored

Find Best BSc Tuition ?

Find Now »