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Saurabh 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Jigyasa replied | 04/08/2016

The real rule is this: the article "a" is used before the words that start with the consonant sound,and "an" before the words that starts with the vowel sound.
Example:He has a unique point of view on the subject and talked about it for an hour.

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Bee replied | 06/08/2016

All words whether noun or adjective in singular form spelled starting with consonent but pronounced with a sound of a vowel will be used with the article "a". E.g a uninion, a university, a utopian concept, a united group etc

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Navneet 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Hridhansh replied | 05/08/2016

It merely the practice..... how much u speak English depends on that ..... u should try speaking English regularly.....

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Nishmitha replied | 29/08/2016

Write the words and read it loud. This will make you understand the differences between the right spelling and mistakes you will be repeating. So this practice will guide you on right path

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Pankaj 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Jigyasa replied | 04/08/2016

Regular nouns are nouns that form their plurals by adding either the letter s or -es (guy, guys; letter, letters; actress, actresses; etc.). To show plural possession, simply put an apostrophe after the s. Rule 2b. Do not use an apostrophe + s to make a regular noun plural.

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Seema replied | 05/08/2016

Yes, we can use apostrophes in plurals after the plural word without adding an s. Eg. Boys', cats'

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M

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Bee replied | 04/08/2016

Long second vovel sound is common when the word's last syllable ends with condiment. Hence Decide and Decision sounds as pronounced

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Hema replied | 04/08/2016

Stress is on second vowel and it has to be longer because it is verb and shorter on second word which is noun

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T

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Amit replied | 22/07/2016

May be optimized as ' The program should been started and ended early.'

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Sonal replied | 27/07/2016

Should have started earlier*

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Eternity 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Deepika replied | 04/08/2016

1(Of a word) having more than one syllable. A word containing many syllables is a polysyllable or polysyllabic word, such as selectivity and utilitarianism.

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Jigyasa replied | 04/08/2016

Having more than one syllable; having multiple or many syllables. "Antidisestablishmentarianism" definitely qualifies as a polysyllabic word.

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Kummara 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Aparna replied | 09/08/2016

In both the words the letter U stands for the sound /w/ as is clear from the transcription of the words : /sweid/ and /pe?gwin/. So as Mitali rightly pointed out the letter U gives aout the the sound of semi vowel /w/.

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Aparna replied | 09/08/2016

In both the words the letter U stands for the sound /w/ as is clear from the transcription of the words : /sweid/ and /pe?gwin/. So as Mitali rightly pointed out the letter U gives out the the sound of semi vowel /w/.

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T

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Sayed replied | 31/07/2016

"meter' is American spelling whereas "metre" is British spelling. In India we follow British spelling

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Nidhi Sethi replied | 02/08/2016

meter is the American spelling, and metre is preferred everywhere else.meter is derived from 'measure' perimeter on the other hand is the path that surrounds a shape not a measuring system like kilometer or kilometre!

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Mrs 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Iec replied | 25/07/2016

Thanks!

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Sonal replied | 27/07/2016

:)

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Milan 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Anupama replied | 19/07/2016

Lui-vill (pronumcir)

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Tanusree replied | 20/07/2016

Loo-I-vill --This should be the pronunciation

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Akila replied | 21/07/2016

loo..eee..vil

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Rakesh replied | 22/07/2016

Louisville is the name of a place in Kentucky in the US. The phonetical pronunciation format of this word is \?l -i-?vil, -v?l\ which, in layman's terms can be described as louivill. Notice that the 's' is silent and the ending part (ville) is ended in the same way as ill. Trust this helps. For more, please visit ...  more»
Louisville is the name of a place in Kentucky in the US. The phonetical pronunciation format of this word is \?lü-i-?vil, -v?l\ which, in layman's terms can be described as louivill. Notice that the 's' is silent and the ending part (ville) is ended in the same way as ill. Trust this helps. For more, please visit http://www.facebook.com/humandevelopmentindex «less

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Rutuja replied | 25/07/2016

It is pronounced lui-wil

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Sonal replied | 27/07/2016

lui -will

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Priya Sidhu replied | 29/07/2016

Read and say lu e vl

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Tanay 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Moiz replied | 03/08/2016

Means a letter getting weakened in word for example t gets weaker in writer

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Mitali replied | 03/08/2016

Lenition means "weakening" and fortition means "strengthening" refer to a sound becoming weak and strong respectively, examples....lentition of T in mother and fortition of T in writer

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Monica 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Maggie replied | 04/08/2016

English and
????l??/ is the phonetic transcription. Did you mean why is English spelling so hard? I agree it is not easy when you're still learning to spell correctly.

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Ameer replied | 04/08/2016

Your question itself carries the correct answer !
However, if you wanted to know "How to spell English 'words' correctly?", then, it is altogether a different as well as a difficult question. There are very few standard rules to apply while writing the spelling of most of the English words. It is only by diligent study and patient practice that one can master the art of English spelling.

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E

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Seema replied | 01/08/2016

Because there is no e sound in the word hello, eeeee will make it sound Hilo which would be wrong

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Iec replied | 04/08/2016

it's more common to write "Helloooo" as it ends with "O". We prolong the only last letters.

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Poonam 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Prayashi replied | 07/08/2016

Carolling

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Walk International replied | 26/08/2016

ANS: Carolling

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Rameshkumar 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Wyatt Coaching Institute replied | 19/08/2016

Your location is what that matters. If you in Delhi you can choose to visot Wyatt Coaching Institute at Laxmi Nagar Metro Station and experience the Demo class.

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Gururaj replied | 29/08/2016

VETA is one of the good institutions that teach Spoken English. They have several branches across the country. There are several free-lancers as well. As a matter of fact, I also teach on-line. The fees may vary from Rs.3000 to Rs.5000 per month.

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Dipak 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Shashank Sharma replied | 03/08/2016

When you're a rapper. That's when.

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Mitali replied | 03/08/2016

Only fully unstressed vowels can be reduced.

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Kirti 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Jigyasa replied | 04/08/2016

around 1900

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Prayashi replied | 07/08/2016

Its not necessary that either you are spelling it as legend or leegend. You can use anyone of it because both meant the same

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Pavithra 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Prayashi replied | 07/08/2016

First of all write the questions properly.it is not at all clear to us that which kind of problems you are facing regarding these suffix.

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Schoolpage replied | 11/08/2016

Practice your English speaking skills.

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Sarath Chandra 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

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Girijaa replied | 13/08/2016

We typically use square brackets when we want to modify someone else's words, i.e., when we want to make it clear that the modification has been made by us, and not by the original writer. For example:
1.to add clarification: ?The student said: "He [the teacher] hit me."
2.to add information: ?The two Nobel Peace Prize Winners in 2014 were from Asia [Malala Yousufzai,...  more»
We typically use square brackets when we want to modify someone else's words, i.e., when we want to make it clear that the modification has been made by us, and not by the original writer. For example:
1.to add clarification: ?The student said: "He [the teacher] hit me."
2.to add information: ?The two Nobel Peace Prize Winners in 2014 were from Asia [Malala Yousufzai, Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi, India].
3.to add missing words: ?It is [a] tough situation.
4.to add editorial or authorial comment: ?They are not authorised to entry [my understanding of the rules].

5.to modify a direct quotation: ?He "love[s] driving." (The original words were "I love driving.")


We also sometimes use square brackets for nesting, for example:
• Square brackets can also be nested (using square brackets [like these] inside round brackets). «less

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Girijaa replied | 13/08/2016

We typically use square brackets when we want to modify someone else's words, i.e., when we want to make it clear that the modification has been made by us, and not by the original writer. For example:
1.to add clarification: ?The student said: "He [the teacher] hit me."
2.to add information: ?The two Nobel Peace Prize Winners in 2014 were from Asia [Malala Yousufzai,...  more»
We typically use square brackets when we want to modify someone else's words, i.e., when we want to make it clear that the modification has been made by us, and not by the original writer. For example:
1.to add clarification: ?The student said: "He [the teacher] hit me."
2.to add information: ?The two Nobel Peace Prize Winners in 2014 were from Asia [Malala Yousufzai, Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi, India].
3.to add missing words: ?It is [a] tough situation.
4.to add editorial or authorial comment: ?They are not authorised to entry [my understanding of the rules].
5.to modify a direct quotation in reported speech or writing: ?He "hate[s] the media for its impudent invasion into the private lives of celebrities." (The original words were "I hate the media for its impudent invasion into the private lives of celebrities.")
We also sometimes use square brackets for nesting, for example:
• Square brackets can also be nested (using square brackets [like these] inside round brackets), as in the following example: Girls from all over the world (many of them from developing nations [ like Africa, Afghanistan, Bangladesh] that do not give importance to women's education) get fee discount in this University. «less

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C

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Mahesh replied | 18/07/2016

Not exactly. Can you give me a real time example please

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Rahul replied | 03/08/2016

Yes

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R

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Manasi replied | 10/08/2016

If the noun is related to a word ending in -ate, then the ending will be -ation, e.g. donation (from donate) or vacation (from vacate). Here are some more examples:
accommodation; location; creation; rotation; education; mediation.

If the ending comes after any consonant apart from -l, -n, or -r, then the ending is spelled -tion:
action; connection; reception;...  more»
If the noun is related to a word ending in -ate, then the ending will be -ation, e.g. donation (from donate) or vacation (from vacate). Here are some more examples:
accommodation; location; creation; rotation; education; mediation.

If the ending comes after any consonant apart from -l, -n, or -r, then the ending is spelled -tion:
action; connection; reception; affection; interruption; description; collection; infection; deception and inscribe thus takes tion.

After -n and -r, the ending can be -tion or -sion. It's more likely to be -tion if the word's related to another one that ends in -t or -tain, e.g. assertion (from assert) or retention (from retain). Here are some more examples:
exertion; invention. «less

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Girijaa replied | 13/08/2016

Inscribe, Subscribe, Prescribe, Describe etc. are verbs and the noun forms are Inscription, Subscription, Prescription and Description.

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Perl 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

Are there any rules for using le, el, ll, and just l

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Pragneshkumar replied | 18/07/2016

Not really. There is a rule for single l and double l. All single syllable words ending in l with a single vowel before the l use a double l. For example:- mill - will - till All single syllable words ending in l with a double vowel before it use a single l. For example:- mail- sail But to be honest English spelling is a bit of a nightmare, even native speakers have problems, not...  more»
Not really. There is a rule for single l and double l. All single syllable words ending in l with a single vowel before the l use a double l. For example:- mill - will - till All single syllable words ending in l with a double vowel before it use a single l. For example:- mail- sail But to be honest English spelling is a bit of a nightmare, even native speakers have problems, not helped by the duality of American and British English spelling. We usually have to learn every word individually. #Pragneshkumar http://www.facebook.com/pragneshkumar.prajapati «less

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Jose replied | 18/07/2016

No rules only common. Practices that can be manipulated by cultural or other influences. Like Indian English and so on.

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Jainam 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

"For words endling in l after a vowel, double the l before adding er, ed or ing

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Raghavendra replied | 18/07/2016

No clarity in questioning

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Subhannita replied | 12/08/2016

If you're talking about the word "Travel", in British English you double the "L" i.e. "Traveller", "Travelled" and "Travelling". But for US English you don't have the do that. You can write "Traveler", "Traveled" and "Traveling". Both are correct.

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Ruptanu 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

how would i spell the verb suffiex ending fy from the word multiplication? --------------------------- How would I spell the verb from the word multiplication?

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Girijaa replied | 12/08/2016

The word 'Multiplication' already has the Suffix 'ation'. A suffix with 'fy' is not added here.
The verb form of Multiplication is Multiply

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Deepthi replied | 13/08/2016

The verb suffix.Clicking "Modify" list will make a copy of this list,so you can
add or remove words.You can also remove words once they have been added to your account.
This is a list of words ending with suffix "fy" meaning "make ,cause (makes the word a verb)".
Examples : mortify,edify,nullify,acidify,personify,simplify,unify,identify,justify,notify,magnify.

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Avinesh 15/07/2016 in  Spoken English classes

why does perimeter has er and metre has re ------------------ Why does perimeter end in er and metre in re?

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Language replied | 09/08/2016

Perimeter is a particular measurement like diameter, whereas metre is unit of distance, both the spelling are British English. In British English unit of distance spells metre whereas in American English spellings are more phonetic so it is meter.

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Girijaa replied | 12/08/2016

Metre ending with 're' stands for specific distance of 100 cm. In American English, this is spelt as Meter. They do not use the metric system of measurements in America. Meter is a different word altogether. It refers to a measuring device or a measured distance along the boundary of something.

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