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Lesson Posted on 17/07/2017 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English Life Skills Coaching/Soft Skills Training/Business English

Preposition Quiz

Mahalakshmi

Having 10 years of working experience in International MNC and trained many employees on English speaking....

My best friend lives ______ Boretz Road. a. In b. On c. At I'll be ready to leave ____ about twenty minutes. a. In b. On c. At Since he met his new friend, Juan never seems to be ______ home. a. On b.... read more
  1. My best friend lives ______ Boretz Road.

a. In

b. On

c. At

  1. I'll be ready to leave ____ about twenty minutes.

a. In

b. On

c. At

  1. Since he met his new friend, Juan never seems to be ______ home.

a. On

b. In

c. At

  1. The child responded to his mother's demands ______ throwing a tantrum.

a. With

b. By

c. From

  1. I think she spent the entire afternoon ______ the phone.

a. On

b. In

c. At

  1. I will wait ______ 6:30, but then I'm going home.

a. From

b. At

c. Until

  1. The police caught the thief _____ the corner of Cascade and Plum Streets.

a. In

b. At

c. From

  1. My fingers were injured so my sister had to write the note _____ me.

a. For

b. With

c. To

  1. I am not interested _____ buying a new car now.

a. To

b. For

c. In

  1. What are the main ingredients ______ this casserole?

a. About

b. To

c. Of

 

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Answered on 04/05/2017 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

Ayantika S.

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Answered on 04/05/2017 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

Ayantika S.

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Answered on 27/02/2017 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

Ruchi Bhatia

Trainer

Presently, start using simple words. For more reference, start watching movies in that language, read novels (simple) and communicate with your friend with whom you feel comfortable and ask him to communicate with you and start pointing at mistakes. Communicating with someone who knows that language... read more
Presently, start using simple words. For more reference, start watching movies in that language, read novels (simple) and communicate with your friend with whom you feel comfortable and ask him to communicate with you and start pointing at mistakes. Communicating with someone who knows that language helps a lot. read less
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Lesson Posted on 03/01/2017 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

Reported speech

Trisha

We use reported speech when we are saying what other people say, think or believe. He says he wants it. We think you are right. I believe he loves her. Yesterday you said you didn't like it but now you do! She told me he had asked her to marry him. I told you she was ill. We thought he was... read more

We use reported speech when we are saying what other people say, think or believe.

  • He says he wants it.
  • We think you are right.
  • I believe he loves her.
  • Yesterday you said you didn't like it but now you do!
  • She told me he had asked her to marry him.
  • I told you she was ill.
  • We thought he was in Australia.

When we are reporting things in the present, future or present perfect we don't change the tense.

  • He thinks he loves her.
  • I'll tell her you are coming.
  • He has said he'll do it.

When we tell people what someone has said in the past, we generally make the tense 'more in the past'.

  • You look very nice. = I told him he looked very nice.
  • He's working in Siberia now. = She told me he was working in Siberia now.
  • Polly has bought a new car. = She said Polly had bought a new car.
  • Jo can't come for the weekend. = She said Jo couldn't come for the weekend.
  • Paul called and left a message. = He told me Paul had called and had left me a message.
  • I'll give you a hand. = He said he would give me a hand.

However, when we are reporting something that was said in the past but is still true, it is not obligatory to make the tense 'more in the past'. The choice is up to the speaker. For example:

"The train doesn't stop here."

  • He said the train doesn't stop here.
  • He said the train didn't stop here.

"I like Sarah."

  • She said she likes Sarah.
  • She said she liked Sarah.

When we are reporting what was said, we sometimes have to change other words in the sentence.

We have to change the pronoun if we are reporting what someone else said. Compare these two sentences. In each case the person actually said "I don't want to go."

  • I said I didn't want to go.
  • Bill said he didn't want to go.

We have to change words referring to 'here and now' if we are reporting what was said in a different place or time.
Compare these two sentences. In each case the person actually said "I'll be there at ten tomorrow."

  • (If it is later the same day) He said he would be there at ten tomorrow.
  • (If it is the next day) He said he would be there at ten today.

Now compare these two sentences.

  • (If we are in a different place) He said he would be there tomorrow at ten.
  • (If we are in the place he is coming to) He said he would be here at ten tomorrow.

 

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Lesson Posted on 03/01/2017 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

Present Continous

Trisha

The present continuous is used to talk about present situations which we see as short-term or temporary. We use the present simple to talk about present situations which we see as long-term or permanent.In these examples, the action is taking place at the time of speaking. It's raining. Who is... read more

The present continuous is used to talk about present situations which we see as short-term or temporary. We use the present simple to talk about present situations which we see as long-term or permanent.

In these examples, the action is taking place at the time of speaking.

  • It's raining.
  • Who is Kate talking to on the phone?
  • Look, somebody is trying to steal that man's wallet.
  • I'm not looking. My eyes are closed tightly.

In these examples, the action is true at the present time but we don't think it will be true in the long term.

  • I'm looking for a new apartment.
  • He's thinking about leaving his job.
  • They're considering making an appeal against the judgment.
  • Are you getting enough sleep?

In these examples, the action is at a definite point in the future and it has already been arranged.

  • I'm meeting her at 6.30.
  • They aren't arriving until Tuesday.
  • We are having a special dinner at a top restaurant for all the senior managers.
  • Isn't he coming to the dinner?

 

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Lesson Posted on 19/12/2016 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

7 Steps to Achieve Your Dream

Hemant Kuchekar

Just try one lecture then you mention our comment that my experience

This are copied paste but i thought it would be useful to all of us. 7 Steps to Achieve Your Dream Want to get going on your goals? This is how. Chris Widener March 25, 2014 “Vision is the spectacular that inspires us to carry out the mundane.” —Chris Widener Can achievement... read more

This are copied paste but i thought it would be useful to all of us.

7 Steps to Achieve Your Dream

Want to get going on your goals? This is how.
March 25, 2014

“Vision is the spectacular that inspires us to carry out the mundane.” —Chris Widener

Can achievement be broken down into steps? It isn’t always that clean and easy, but those who achieve great things usually go through much of the same process, with many of the items listed below as part of that process. So if you have been struggling with achievement, look through the following. Begin to apply them and you will be on the road to achieving your dream.

 

 

Step 1: Dream it. Everything begins in the heart and mind. Every great achievement began in the mind of one person. They dared to dream, to believe that it was possible. Take some time to allow yourself to ask “What if?” Think big. Don’t let negative thinking discourage you. You want to be a “dreamer.” Dream of the possibilities for yourself, your family and for others. If you had a dream that you let grow cold, re-ignite the dream! Fan the flames. Life is too short to let it go.

Step 2: Believe it. Yes, your dream needs to be big. It needs to be something that is seemingly beyond your capabilities. But it also must be believable. You must be able to say that if certain things take place, if others help, if you work hard enough, though it is a big dream, it can still be done. Good example: A person with no college education can dream that he will build a $50 million-a-year company. That is big, but believable. Bad example: That a 90-year-old woman with arthritis will someday run a marathon in under three hours. It is big all right, but also impossible. She should instead focus on building a $50 million-a-year business! And she better get a move on!

Step 3: See it. The great achievers have a habit. They “see” things. They picture themselves walking around their CEO office in their new $25 million corporate headquarters, even while they are sitting on a folding chair in their garage “headquarters.” Great free-throw shooters in the NBA picture the ball going through the basket. PGA golfers picture the ball going straight down the fairway. World-class speakers picture themselves speaking with energy and emotion. All of this grooms the mind to control the body to carry out the dream.

Step 4: Tell it. One reason many dreams never go anywhere is because the dreamer keeps it all to himself. It is a quiet dream that only lives inside of his mind. The one who wants to achieve their dream must tell that dream to many people. One reason: As we continually say it, we begin to believe it more and more. If we are talking about it then it must be possible. Another reason: It holds us accountable. When we have told others, it spurs us on to actually doing it so we don’t look foolish.

Step 5: Plan it. Every dream must take the form of a plan. The old saying that you “get what you plan for” is so true. Your dream won’t just happen. You need to sit down, on a regular basis, and plan out your strategy for achieving the dream. Think through all of the details. Break the whole plan down into small, workable parts. Then set a time frame for accomplishing each task on your “dream plan.”

Step 6: Work it. Boy, wouldn’t life be grand if we could quit before this one! Unfortunately the successful are usually the hardest workers. While the rest of the world is sitting on their sofas watching reruns of Gilligan's Island, achievers are working on their goal—achieving their dream. I have an equation that I work with: Your short-term tasks, multiplied by time, equal your long-term accomplishments. If you work on it each day, eventually you will achieve your dream. War and Peace was written, in longhand, page by page.

Step 7: Enjoy it. When you have reached your goal and you are living your dream, be sure to enjoy it. In fact, enjoy the trip, too. Give yourself some rewards along the way. Give yourself a huge reward when you get there. Help others enjoy it. Be gracious and generous. Use your dream to better others. Then go back to No. 1. And dream a little bigger this time!

 

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Lesson Posted on 16/12/2016 Tuition/Class I-V Tuition Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

How we teach English in India?

Readmyscript Outreach Program

read, speak and spell like an expert. Become expert spellers and identify the right pronunciation...

Our teachers have been struggling to find out ways to help students with reading, speaking and writing in English language. The task becomes all the more difficult when we are targeting children. How should we write a word if we’ve only heard the sound or how should we pronounce... read more

Our teachers have been struggling to find out ways to help students with reading, speaking and writing in English language. The task becomes all the more difficult when we are targeting children. How should we write a word if we’ve only heard the sound or how should we pronounce a word when we are seeing it for the very first time? How well we recognize and apply sounds to a physical representation (written group of letters), is an art! If we include non-native English speaking regions, broadly there are two approaches followed to train learners on a language in schools:

Sound-centric approach.
Sound centric approach is followed to teach learners on their native language. Learners already know how to speak in the language before they start school. In school, they learn to read and write, and they build vocabulary. Learners are introduced to new words and eventually they build vocabulary. Consciously and sometimes unintentionally, they start memorizing word sounds and spellings. They hear word sounds so often that they successfully memorize words without much effort. Native language learners normally don’t have confusions about word sounds. Even if they face some difficultly with foreign origin words, they read according to their understanding of structure. It is not that native speakers are not struggling with spellings. English spellings are causing a lot of difficulties to native speakers as well. So, teachers ultimately encourage them to memorize spelling.

In native English speaking countries teachers adopt following techniques:

1. Whole language: Focus is on meaning and interpretation of literature.
2. Whole word, Sight word, or look and say: Focus is on the appearance of words and recognition thereon. Often taught by picture next to the word and encouraging students to associate words to meaning. This technique is only effective initially as learners automatically recognize a small selection of words. However, the ability to recognize words stalls when encountered with complex word in the course of learning.
3. Initiate teaching alphabet: Limited to only segmental level, as the focus is on individual letter sounds.
4. Phonics:
a) Synthetic: Students are taught individual letter sounds, sounds of commonly used letters, consonant blends and diagraphs.
b) Analytic phonics: Students are not taught sounds in isolation. However, consonant blends are taught as units. Also, they are taught to break down words into onset and rime. Children are taught to find similarities among words. However, the techniques are not well defined.

Script- centric approach.
Script-centric approach is followed to teach learners on a second language. As a learner of a second language, even if you know how to speak a little in the language before you start school, you are often not aware of actual word sounds. So in school, second language learners learn how to speak, read and write simultaneously. They are encouraged to memorize spellings and word sounds. Even if they falter while vocalizing words or reading words, it is conveniently ignored because they have to write to pass examination or they are given sounds which are quite not the actual pronunciation of words and also asked to memorize thereon.

Different techniques that we follow to teach learners in regions where English is taught as a second language, are borrowed from countries where students know of word sounds and they struggle with spellings only. Learners are left with their individual prediction of sound value and quality. Focus is not at all on right enunciation of words. When they read a word, they try to break it in to smaller chunks. Learners are left to their whims and fancies when it comes to reading. Students don’t have any clue about stress location in words and they don’t read or vocalize actual word sounds.

Applicability in a non-native English speaking region:
“Given both the widespread belief that English spelling is irregular and the previous studies that stressed visual memory for words, it’s no surprise that many teachers teach spelling by writing words on flashcards and exposing students to them many times or by having students write words 5 to 10 times”.

However, in regions where English is taught as a second language, teachers not just teach through flash cards and having students write words multiple times, they also recommend them to break words in smaller parts while reading. This method of breaking words in smaller parts in an attempt to read multi-syllabic words doesn’t support actual sound of the words. Learning under the influence of this reading technique, learners develop their scripting style built on commonly mispronounced words; which in turn serves as a paradigm on which learners build their reading and speaking style (perceptual understanding of writing system).

This sub-scripting style is reflected in the way learners read, write their native language words with the help of English alphabetic script and the way they speak in English.
In a non-native English speaking region, a child can possibly learn to read, write and speak:

1. By memorizing spellings and their corresponding sounds with “whole word” and other non-effective techniques.

2. By adopting a sub-scripting style.

3. By developing orthographic memory and applying logical explanation on stress allocation and syllabification learned through readmyscript outreach program. 

Content for readmyscript program comes from a well researched Spelling reform suggestion called Onescript. Onescript gives us a new perspective towards training English as a second language through a pioneering investigation on every possible aspect of human speech from physiology of speech to morphology, phonology, auditory phonetics, perceptual phonetics and articulatory phonetics. The idea is that if a learner goes through readmyscript program, he would be in a position to identify each and every sound that we have in English language right by just looking at structural arrangement of letters. He would be able to write the right spelling of almost all the words if he is getting to listen to the right sound of words.

Learners would not need to waste time memorizing spellings & pronunciation. They would read, speak and spell like an expert. They would become expert spellers and be able identify the right pronunciation of almost all of the words that we have in English by just looking at spellings. They would develop automaticity in reading, save time, concentrate on core subjects instead and enhance overall academic score.

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Answered on 23 Jan CBSE/Class 10/English Tuition/Class I-V Tuition/English

Hello Everyone, I am currently taking Spoken English classes at home,and am also associated with Mater... read more
Hello Everyone, I am currently taking Spoken English classes at home,and am also associated with Mater Dei School, New Delhi, as a teacher. I was interested in conducting English language tution classes at my residence itself, for children of classes I-IX. Could someone please advice me as to what should the fee structure be for such kind of tutions, on a monthly basis ? Thank you in advance. read less

Tanvi Madbhavi

Highly Qualified Tutor

I can tell you hourly fees for spoken english classes- Rs.250 to 300.
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