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Asked 5 days ago CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Reading Skills/Landscape of the Soul/NCERT Solutions/Working with words 4

Now find five sentences each for the rest of the words to show the different senses in which each of them is used. read more

Now find five sentences each for the rest of the words to show the different senses in which each of them is used.

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Answered 6 days ago CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Reading Skills/Childhood/NCERT Solutions/Think it out L6. P4

What is the poet’s feeling towards childhood?

Tasneem

For the poet, childhood seems to be a thing of past. He ponders over the questions as to ‘when’ and ‘where’ did his childhood go. He tries to identify the specific moment, time or day when he lost his childhood and stepped into adulthood. He indicates that childhood is naive... read more

For the poet, childhood seems to be a thing of past. He ponders over the questions as to ‘when’ and ‘where’ did his childhood go. He tries to identify the specific moment, time or day when he lost his childhood and stepped into adulthood.

He indicates that childhood is naive and does not understand hypocrisy. At this stage of life, rational thinking and individuality are yet to be developed. The poet feels that his childhood is gone forever and can only be found in the innocent face of an infant.

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Answered 6 days ago CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Reading Skills/Silk Road/NCERT Solutions/Working with words 8

The narrative has many phrases to describe the scenic beauty of the mountainside like: A flawless half-moon... read more

The narrative has many phrases to describe the scenic beauty of the mountainside like:

A flawless half-moon floated in a perfect blue sky.

Scan the text to locate other such picturesque phrases. read less

Tasneem

Here are a few extracts from the text that describe the scenic beauty of the Tibet region: "Extended banks of cloud like long French loaves glowed pink as the sun emerged to splash the distant mountain tops with a rose-tinted blush." "We entered a valley where the river was wide and mostly clogged with... read more

Here are a few extracts from the text that describe the scenic beauty of the Tibet region:

"Extended banks of cloud like long French loaves glowed pink as the sun emerged to splash the distant mountain tops with a rose-tinted blush."

"We entered a valley where the river was wide and mostly clogged with ice, brilliant white and glinting in the sunshine. The trail hugged its bank, twisting with the meanders as we gradually gained height and the valley sides closed in."

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Answered on 04 Nov CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Writing Skills/Summarising/NCERT Solutions/Summarize 2

Read the text below and summarise it.

Green Sahara

The Great Desert Where Hippos Once Wallowed

The Sahara sets a standard for dry land. It’s the world’s largest desert. Relative humidity can drop into the low single digits. There are places where it rains only about once a century. There are people who reach the end of their lives without ever seeing water come from the sky.

Yet beneath the Sahara are vast aquifers of fresh water, enough liquid to fill a small sea. It is fossil water, a treasure laid down in prehistoric times, some of it possibly a million years old. Just 6,000 years ago, the Sahara was a much different place.

It was green. Prehistoric rock art in the Sahara shows something surprising: hippopotamuses, which need year-round water.

“We don’t have much evidence of a tropical paradise out there, but we had something perfectly liveable,” says Jennifer Smith, a geologist at Washington University in St Louis.

The green Sahara was the product of the migration of the paleo-monsoon. In the same way that ice ages come and go, so too do monsoons migrate north and south. The dynamics of earth’s motion are responsible. The tilt of the earth’s axis varies in a regular cycle — sometimes the planet is more tilted towards the sun, sometimes less so. The axis also wobbles like a spinning top. The date of the earth’s perihelion — its closest approach to the sun — varies in cycle as well.

At times when the Northern Hemisphere tilts sharply towards the sun and the planet makes its closest approach, the increased blast of sunlight during the north’s summer months can cause the African monsoon (which currently occurs between the Equator and roughly 17°N latitude) to shift to the north as it did 10,000 years ago, inundating North Africa.

Around 5,000 years ago the monsoon shifted dramatically southward again. The prehistoric inhabitants of the Sahara discovered that their relatively green surroundings were undergoing something worse than a drought (and perhaps they migrated towards the Nile Valley, where Egyptian culture began to flourish at around the same time).

“We’re learning, and only in recent years, that some climate changes in the past have been as rapid as anything underway today,” says Robert Giegengack, a University of Pennsylvania geologist.

As the land dried out and vegetation decreased, the soil lost its ability to hold water when it did rain. Fewer clouds formed from evaporation. When it rained, the water washed away and evaporated quickly. There was a kind of runaway drying effect. By 4,000 years ago the Sahara had become what it is today.

No one knows how human-driven climate change may alter the Sahara in the future. It’s something scientists can ponder while sipping bottled fossil water pumped from underground.

“It’s the best water in Egypt,” Giegengack said — clean, refreshing mineral water. If you want to drink something good, try the ancient buried treasure of the Sahara.

JOEL ACHENBACK
Staff Writer, Washington Post
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Disha

The Sahara was a desert full of monsoons and greenery land, but after a few years, the Sahara was completely changed, and no one knows how it was changed.Around 5,000 years ago the monsoon shifted dramatically, southward again. Hence here the writer wanted to say that we do not understand the climate... read more

The Sahara was a desert full of monsoons and greenery land, but after a few years, the Sahara was completely changed, and no one knows how it was changed.Around 5,000 years ago the monsoon shifted dramatically, southward again. Hence here the writer wanted to say that we do not understand the climate or environmental conditions if we neglect, then we also have the same condition as Sahara land.

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Answered 5 days ago CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Writing Skills/Sub-titling/NCERT Solutions/Activity 3

Notice the italicized sentence placed at the top of the article which tells us at a glance what the article is about.

Tasneem

(Students just need to read the italicized sentence at the top of the article and notice how it puts forth the main idea of the article)
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Answered 6 days ago CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Writing Skills/Sub-titling/NCERT Solutions/Activity 3

Divide the article into four sections based on the shifts in the sub-topics and give a suitable sub-heading... read more
Divide the article into four sections based on the shifts in the sub-topics and give a suitable sub-heading for each section. One has been done for you in the article as an example. read less

Tasneem

(The first sub-topic has been given in the article. The other three are given below.)Ineffective policies for the basic amenities of lifePost-liberalisation policies have tended to largely disregard other key factors that affect the quality of life in cities and towns: poverty, lack of sanitation, water... read more

(The first sub-topic has been given in the article. The other three are given below.)

Ineffective policies for the basic amenities of life
Post-liberalisation policies have tended to largely disregard other key factors that affect the quality of life in cities and towns: poverty, lack of sanitation, water shortages, gross under supply of affordable housing, and traffic chaos generated by automobile dependence, in turn created by neglect of public transport.
In the absence of a hygienic environment and safe water supply, chronic water-borne diseases such as cholera and other communicable diseases continue to stalk the poor in the biggest cities.
It must be sobering to the affluent layers of the population that nearly14 million Indian households (forming 26 per cent of the total) in the urban areas do not have a latrine within the house, as per the Census of India 2001; some 14 per cent have only rudimentary ‘pit’ facilities. The number of households without a drainage connection stands at 11.8 million (representing 22.1 per cent of households). Migration to cities continues and infrastructure to treat sewage is grossly inadequate to meet the demand even where it exists.
It is unlikely that the quality of the urban environment can be dramatically improved therefore, if such fundamental questions remain unresolved.

Frequent road accidents
Urban transport receives scant attention from policymakers. Policy distortions have led to rising automobile dependency, higher safety risks for road users, and land use plans that are based not on the needs of people, but primarily designed to facilitate use of private motorised vehicles.
It comes as no surprise therefore that pedestrians and bicycle riders, who form 30 to 70 per cent of peak hour traffic in most urban centres, also make up a large proportion of fatalities in road accidents. A paper prepared by the Transport Researchand Injury Prevention Programme (TRIPP) of the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, says pedestrianfatalities in Mumbai and Delhi were nearly 78 per cent and 53 per cent of the total, according to recent data, compared to 13 per cent and 12 per cent in Germany and the United States.
Such alarming death rates — and an equally high injury rate — should persuade policymakers to revisit their urban planning strategies and correct the distortions. But manycities such as Chennai have actually done the reverse — reduced footpaths and areas for pedestrian use to facilitate unrestricted use of motorised vehicles.

Innovative urban plans adopted in Curitiba
The practice in progressive world cities has been different. Curitiba in Brazil, which has attracted global attention for innovative urban plans using low-cost technologies, has done everything that Indian policymakers would dread to do. Starting in the 1970s, this provincial centre with the highest per capita ownership of cars in Brazil (other than the capital) at the time, banned automobiles from many crowded areas in favour of pedestrians, built an internationally acknowledged bus system that reduced household commuting expenditure to below the national average, and created new housing areas that were provided transport links in a planned manner. Some of the prestigious land development in the city, including a new Opera House, came up in abandoned sites such as quarries.
The bus-way system cut riding time by a third, Scientific American noted in a review in the mid-1990s, by providing for advance ticketing, specially designed boarding areas with wider doors for entry/exit and dedicated lanes for faster transit.
In another low-cost initiative, Curitiba managed floods with a dedication that Mumbai, Bangalore, and Chennai can only marvel at. The city created large artificial lakes in suitable places that filled up in the monsoon, avoiding flooding of residential areas. In the summer, these lakes turned into parks to provide recreational spaces.
State administrations and urban planning bodies in India follow policies that, ironically, allow filling of existing wetlands by real estate lobbies, leading to flooding. The residents then demand expensive new storm water drains.
Examples such as Curitiba show that inclusive development models for urban renewal are workable. If only the state and local governments can be persuaded to adopt a rights-based approach to affordable housing, sanitation, water supply, mobility and a clean environment, instead of a market-oriented model that lays excessive emphasis on recovery of costs incurred by profit-oriented private sector service provision. Support from a progressive middle class and trade unions is equally critical to bring about genuine urban renewal.

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Answered 5 days ago CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Hornbill - Writing Skills/Sub-titling/NCERT Solutions/Activity 3

Look for pictures in newspapers and magazines that depict the urban civic problems discussed in the text.... read more
Look for pictures in newspapers and magazines that depict the urban civic problems discussed in the text. Cut them out and pin them to the text at appropriate places.

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Tasneem

(Students are advised to answer this question on their own.)
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Answered on 23 Oct CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Snapshots/The Tale of Melon City/NCERT Solutions/Reading with insight 8

Naveen Kumar

Btech perusing student with morals and ethics determined in educating the best to the studnets.

Once upon a time, there lived a king who was placid. He, once he desired to construct an arch, which would eddy the people. The kings' desire was soon implemented, and a beautiful arch was constructed.When the king rode down the thoroughfare, his crown has fallen down from his head getting hit by the... read more

Once upon a time, there lived a king who was placid. He, once he desired to construct an arch, which would eddy the people. The kings' desire was soon implemented, and a beautiful arch was constructed.
When the king rode down the thoroughfare, his crown has fallen down from his head getting hit by the arch, which was constructed too low. The king considered it as a disgrace to him and wanted to hang the culprit.
 
He immediately ordered the soldiers to hang the chief of the builders. The chief then said that it was the mistake of the builders. Then the king shifted the punishment to the builders. The builders then cried that the size of the bricks was more; hence, the architect must be hanged. Thus the punishment was finally shifted to the architect. The architect reminded the king that, the king himself had made some amendments in the design that he had shown. Now it finally turned towards the king.
 
He thought for a while and ordered the soldiers to bring the wisest man in the country. As ordered by the king, they brought an old man, who can barely see and hear. He suggested that the arch should be hanged since it was the reason for such disgrace, which was immediately put into practice. Then one of the ministers objected saying that how can they hang an arch so shamefully. Then the king took back his decision and wanted to deal it his own way.
 
The said that the nation wants someone to be hanged immediately, so every man was measured by and by and only one man was tall enough to get stuck in the arch, and it was the king. So finally, he was hanged.
 
The people of the country then wanted a new king. According to their tradition, they asked the first person to pass the city gate. Unfortunately, the person was a mad man. When the soldiers asked him about, who the next king should be? He replied ‘melon’, as he liked them the most. So a melon was finally crowned and was put on the royal throne.

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Answered on 23 Oct CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Snapshots/The Address/NCERT Solutions/Reading with insight 2

Naveen Kumar

Btech perusing student with morals and ethics determined in educating the best to the studnets.

She wanted to forget the address because it had things belonging to her mother who was no more. The things present in that house such as cutlery, silver, crockery, furniture accessories, etc would remind her of her mother and her painful past. So, she wanted to forget the address 46, Marconi Street. read more

She wanted to forget the address because it had things belonging to her mother who was no more. The things present in that house such as cutlery, silver, crockery, furniture accessories, etc would remind her of her mother and her painful past. So, she wanted to forget the address 46, Marconi Street.

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Answered on 18 Oct CBSE/Class 11/English/English - Snapshots/The Tale of Melon City/NCERT Solutions/Reading with insight 8

What impression would you form of a state where the King was ‘just and placid’?

Aswathi

A state where the king was Just and placid enjoyed peace, liberty and justice. The king was titular and symbolic. The citizens enjoyed freedom of all kinds. The real governance of the country was in the hands of the citizens. In the poem 'The Tale of a Melon City' the king had to be hanged as the citizens... read more

A state where the king was Just and placid enjoyed peace, liberty and justice. The king was titular and symbolic. The citizens enjoyed freedom of all kinds. The real governance of the country was in the hands of the citizens. In the poem 'The Tale of a Melon City' the king had to be hanged as the citizens ultimately wanted someone to be hung. The king could not defend himself. Even though the wisest man gave the verdict that the arch was the real culprit but the citizens wanted someone to be hanged. Ultimately, the king was hanged. This shows that in such a state where the king was just and placid the citizens influenced the fate of a king.

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