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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

What was the Copernican revolution?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

The Copernican Revolution was the paradigm shift from the Ptolemaic model of the heavens, which described the cosmos as having Earth stationary at the center of the universe, to the heliocentric model with the Sun at the center of the Solar System.The 16th century finally saw what came to be a watershed... read more

The Copernican Revolution was the paradigm shift from the Ptolemaic model of the heavens, which described the cosmos as having Earth stationary at the center of the universe, to the heliocentric model with the Sun at the center of the Solar System.The 16th century finally saw what came to be a watershed in the development of Cosmology. In 1543 Nicolas Copernicus published his treatise De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (The Revolution of Celestial Spheres) where a new view of the world is presented: the heliocentric model. The story of Copernican Revolution is the classic example of a major shift in worldview. So, before exploring what is happening in the present day and where it may be leading us, let us first go back and briefly recap the salient features of this earlier revolution. 

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

Mention any two characteristic features of Genghis Khan.

Sujoy D.

Tutor

In his opinion , the most important thing was loyalty. He didn’t recruit the ones who seem rebellious. You can walk from Korea to Germany and nothing will happen to you in his empire because his authority was so strong that peoples can’t dare to commit a crime. He basically made the trade... read more

In his opinion , the most important thing was loyalty. He didn’t recruit the ones who seem rebellious.

You can walk from Korea to Germany and nothing will happen to you in his empire because his authority was so strong that peoples can’t dare to commit a crime. He basically made the trade in the Silkroad and the Spice route safe again. Everyone accepted that. If you are a merchant, than you might thank to Genghis Khan for making you rich, if you can survive.

His empire based on meritocracy. He gathered all the qualified men no matter the race. One of his best commanders, Subedei, he was a Tuvan , a Turkic tribe in Central Asia.

We all know that his wrath is deadly but he didn’t massacred the peoples if they surrender at first. Basically, he kills you if you fight against them.

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

How Deng Xioping brought the socialist market economy in china?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

Although the United States and the European Union continue to deny that China has established a market economy, a number of other nations, including New Zealand, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, have agreed that China has. When most Chinese were fearful even to mention the term "market economy," the... read more

Although the United States and the European Union continue to deny that China has established a market economy, a number of other nations, including New Zealand, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, have agreed that China has.

When most Chinese were fearful even to mention the term "market economy," the late leader Deng Xiaoping vigorously preached its adoption during his historic 1992 inspection tour to south China. Deng's bold remarks brushed aside ignorance and deep-rooted prejudice over market economies, which socialist Chinese used to call "capitalist rubbish."

What Deng clarified on the market economy issue made him an unrivaled economic pioneer in China. He said in his most frequently quoted words that "Practice of a planned economy is not equivalent to socialism because there is planning under capitalism too; Practice of a market economy is not equivalent to capitalism because there are markets under socialism too."

Experts believe Deng's simple but penetrating paradox opened China's access to a market economy.

In 1993, the year after Deng made his historic remarks, more than 40 well-known Chinese economics scholars published the book " Chinese Leading Economists on Reform." In it, the economists discuss the feasibility and legality of the market economy that would come into being in a socialist country.

It seemed that academic thinkers were following in the statesman's steps.

Deng originally surprised the world with his "non-socialist" opinions in 1979, when China kicked off the landmark government reform and opening up drive. In a meeting with visiting foreign guests, Deng amazed them by unexpectedly asking "Why can't a socialist country have a market economy?" Later China created its four Special Economic Zones where a fledgling market economy began to take shape.

"Deng Xiaoping is known as the 'chief architect' for China's reform and opening up policies," said Ding Chun, an economics professor at Shanghai-based Fudan University. "China didn't clearly articulate that the goal of economic reform was to establish a socialist market economy until 1992 when Deng Xiaoping made his south China tour and gave speeches on the market economy."

Deng's foresight and determination encouraged him to push through implementation and improvement of Chinese-style market economy, which maintained many "Chinese characteristics" that fit China's actuality, according to Ding.

China's market economy has been successful and prosperous, though negotiations over the market economy status will continue and bargaining between China and its US and EU partners will remain hard.

Over the past decade, China's gross domestic product grew by more than 8 percent per year, and its foreign currency reserve exceeds 400 billion US dollars. Most economists agree that it is simply a matter of time until China's full market economy status is recognized by major economic powers.  Some Chinese see US and EU reluctance to grant China full market economy status might result from the desire to hold the upper hand in negotiations over other issues, such as pressuring China to open its doors wider and faster in some industries.

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

What were the crusades?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

The Crusades were a series of military campaigns during the time of Medieval England against the Muslims of the Middle East. In 1076, the Muslims had captured Jerusalem – the most holy of holy places for Christians. ... He was crucified on Calvary Hill, also in Jerusalem.The Crusades were a series... read more
The Crusades were a series of military campaigns during the time of Medieval England against the Muslims of the Middle East. In 1076, the Muslims had captured Jerusalem – the most holy of holy places for Christians. ... He was crucified on Calvary Hill, also in Jerusalem.The Crusades were a series of religious wars between Christians and Muslims started primarily to secure control of holy sites considered sacred by both groups. In all, eight major Crusade expeditions occurred between 1096 and 1291.The Crusades were a series of military campaigns during the time of Medieval England against the Muslims of the Middle East. In 1076, the Muslims had captured Jerusalem – the most holy of holy places for Christians.
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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

Why Dr. Sun-Yet-Sen. is regarded as the founder of modern china?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

It is clear why ROC considers Sun as the father of the nation.The reason why PRC takes Sun yat-senas the father of the nation is somehow as Richie said. There are some other points I can add.PRC, or CCP considers Chiang Kai-shek was not the successor of Sun, and the KMT ruled by Chiang was not the same... read more

It is clear why ROC considers Sun as the father of the nation.
The reason why PRC takes Sun yat-senas the father of  the nation is somehow as Richie said. There are some other points I can add.
PRC, or CCP considers Chiang Kai-shek was not the successor of Sun, and the KMT ruled by Chiang was not the same as the KMT founded by Sun. CCP claims that Chiang went against Sun's will and CCP is somehow the successor of KMT founded by Sun and Sun's will. When Sun was alive, he tried to cooperate with CCP in order to reunite China. Sun was friendly to CCP, even at that time CCP was very weak. When CCP took over the most part of China, some CCP leaders would even like to use ROC as the name of the China controlled by CCP.
Personally, I think CCP knows that KMT has great influence on the Chinese people  for its contribution to the founding of a new China. If CCP claims that Sun is "as bad as Chiang", most Chinese people will not support CCP.

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

What led to the rise of the communist party in china? How new democracy was established in 1949 in china?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

On October 1, 1949, Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong declared the creation of the People's Republic of China (PRC). ... The Chinese Communist Party, founded in 1921 in Shanghai, originally existed as a study group working within the confines of the First United Front with the Nationalist Party. On... read more

On October 1, 1949, Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong declared the creation of the People's Republic of China (PRC). ... The Chinese Communist Party, founded in 1921 in Shanghai, originally existed as a study group working within the confines of the First United Front with the Nationalist Party.

On October 1, 1949, Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong declared the creation of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The announcement ended the costly full-scale civil war between the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the Nationalist Party, or Kuomintang (KMT), which broke out immediately following World War II and had been preceded by on and off conflict between the two sides since the 1920’s. The creation of the PRC also completed the long process of governmental upheaval in China begun by the Chinese Revolution of 1911. The “fall” of mainland China to communism in 1949 led the United States to suspend diplomatic ties with the PRC for decades.


Communists entering Beijing in 1949.

The Chinese Communist Party, founded in 1921 in Shanghai, originally existed as a study group working within the confines of the First United Front with the Nationalist Party. Chinese Communists joined with the Nationalist Army in the Northern Expedition of 1926–27 to rid the nation of the warlords that prevented the formation of a strong central government. This collaboration lasted until the “White Terror” of 1927, when the Nationalists turned on the Communists, killing them or purging them from the party.

After the Japanese invaded Manchuria in 1931, the Government of the Republic of China (ROC) faced the triple threat of Japanese invasion, Communist uprising, and warlord insurrections. Frustrated by the focus of the Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek on internal threats instead of the Japanese assault, a group of generals abducted Chiang in 1937 and forced him to reconsider cooperation with the Communist army. As with the first effort at cooperation between the Nationalist government and the CCP, this Second United Front was short-lived. The Nationalists expended needed resources on containing the Communists, rather than focusing entirely on Japan, while the Communists worked to strengthen their influence in rural society.

During World War II, popular support for the Communists increased. U.S. officials in China reported a dictatorial suppression of dissent in Nationalist-controlled areas. These undemocratic polices combined with wartime corruption made the Republic of China Government vulnerable to the Communist threat. The CCP, for its part, experienced success in its early efforts at land reform and was lauded by peasants for its unflagging efforts to fight against the Japanese invaders.


Chiang Kai-shek

Japanese surrender set the stage for the resurgence of civil war in China. Though only nominally democratic, the Nationalist Government of Chiang Kai-shek continued to receive U.S. support both as its former war ally and as the sole option for preventing Communist control of China. U.S. forces flew tens of thousands of Nationalist Chinese troops into Japanese-controlled territory and allowed them to accept the Japanese surrender. The Soviet Union, meanwhile, occupied Manchuria and only pulled out when Chinese Communist forces were in place to claim that territory.

In 1945, the leaders of the Nationalist and Communist parties, Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong, met for a series of talks on the formation of a post-war government. Both agreed on the importance of democracy, a unified military, and equality for all Chinese political parties. The truce was tenuous, however, and, in spite of repeated efforts by U.S. General George Marshall to broker an agreement, by 1946 the two sides were fighting an all-out civil war. Years of mistrust between the two sides thwarted efforts to form a coalition government.

As the civil war gained strength from 1947 to 1949, eventual Communist victory seemed more and more likely. Although the Communists did not hold any major cities after World War II, they had strong grassroots support, superior military organization and morale, and large stocks of weapons seized from Japanese supplies in Manchuria. Years of corruption and mismanagement had eroded popular support for the Nationalist Government. Early in 1947, the ROC Government was already looking to the island province of Taiwan, off the coast of Fujian Province, as a potential point of retreat. Although officials in the Truman Administration were not convinced of the strategic importance to the United States of maintaining relations with Nationalist China, no one in the U.S. Government wanted to be charged with facilitating the “loss” of China to communism. Military and financial aid to the floundering Nationalists continued, though not at the level that Chiang Kai-shek would have liked. In October of 1949, after a string of military victories, Mao Zedong proclaimed the establishment of the PRC; Chiang and his forces fled to Taiwan to regroup and plan for their efforts to retake the mainland.

The ability of the PRC and the United States to find common ground in the wake of the establishment of the new Chinese state was hampered by both domestic politics and global tensions. In August of 1949, the Truman administration published the “China White Paper,” which explained past U.S. policy toward China based upon the principle that only Chinese forces could determine the outcome of their civil war. Unfortunately for Truman, this step failed to protect his administration from charges of having “lost” China. The unfinished nature of the revolution, leaving a broken and exiled but still vocal Nationalist Government and Army on Taiwan, only heightened the sense among U.S. anti-communists that the outcome of the struggle could be reversed. The outbreak of the Korean War, which pitted the PRC and the United States on opposite sides of an international conflict, ended any opportunity for accommodation between the PRC and the United States. Truman’s desire to prevent the Korean conflict from spreading south led to the U.S. policy of protecting the Chiang Kai-shek government on Taiwan.

For more than twenty years after the Chinese revolution of 1949, there were few contacts, limited trade and no diplomatic ties between the two countries. Until the 1970s, the United States continued to recognize the Republic of China, located on Taiwan, as China’s true government and supported that government’s holding the Chinese seat in the United Nations.

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

What is the New Testament?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

The New Testament (Greek: ? Καιν? Διαθ?κη, H? Kain? Diath?k?; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament discusses the teachings... read more

The New Testament (Greek: ? Καιν? Διαθ?κη, H? Kain? Diath?k?; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity.The New Testament is a record of historical events, the 'good news' events of the saving life of the Lord Jesus Christ—His life, death, resurrection, ascension, and the continuation of His work in the world—which is explained and applied by the apostles whom He chose and sent into the world.Christians see in the New Testament the fulfillment of the promise of the Old Testament. It relates and interprets the new covenant, represented in the life and death of Jesus, between God and the followers of the Christ. Like the Old Testament, it contains a variety of kinds of writing.

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

What is the idea given by William with regard to bible?

Sujoy D.

Tutor

obviously the eighth king of England to bear the name of Henry, was a robust 33-year-old in 1524. He had already excelled in many areas, had acquired a number of accolades, and could easily have felt that the world was at his feet. In fact, much of his surrounding world seemed to act as if it were... read more

obviously the eighth king of England to bear the name of Henry, was a robust 33-year-old in 1524.

 
He had already excelled in many areas, had acquired a number of accolades, and could easily have felt that the world was at his feet. In fact, much of his surrounding world seemed to act as if it were lying at his feet.


With his impressive size, his impressive clothes, his impressive pomp and ceremony, his Renaissance education and his unflagging self-confidence, he appeared larger than life to most of his subjects, and was seen as a major force to be reckoned with in the European balance of power. He was at least what our age would call “an achiever,” probably even “an over-achiever.” He could play multiple musical instruments, dance, hunt game, lead an army, win at a joust, control his nobles and spend money like it grew on trees. Whatever constituted the stage, Henry VIII dominated it.

Even theology was not beyond the exertions of this highly confident King. When Martin Luther questioned the reigning theology of the period, with its minimal piety and its idolatry of popes, priests, saints and symbols, Henry considered himself quite capable of rebutting the troublesome Saxon monk, and soon produced his Defense of the Seven Sacraments. This appeared in 1520, about one year after Luther’s writings began to achieve really-wide circulation, and was almost entirely Henry’s work. For a while at least, it was the predominant theological apologetic in England for the traditional Catholic faith.

Although today, post-Reformation, we might question the Defenses’s effectiveness in combatting “the Lutheran heresy,” the pope at the time was apparently impressed with it.

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Answered on 31 Jan CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

Explain how the fortification and roads in the city of Vijayanagara were unique and impressive.

Sujoy D.

Tutor

The Ancient City of Vijayanagara refers to the urban core of the imperial city and the surrounding principalities of the capital of the Vijayanagar empire during the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries C.E. Notes by foreign travelers such as Abdur Razzak, the Persian who visited Vijayanagara in 1440, mention... read more

The Ancient City of Vijayanagara refers to the urban core of the imperial city and the surrounding principalities of the capital of the Vijayanagar empire during the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries C.E. Notes by foreign travelers such as Abdur Razzak, the Persian who visited Vijayanagara in 1440, mention six fortifications before the gates to the royal palace. The large area between the first and third fortifications contained agricultural fields, gardens, and residences. The notes of Robert Sewell describe countless shops and bazaars (markets) filled with people from different nationalities between this fortification and the palace.

The ancient city of Vijayanagara was a marvel to behold. One of the great cities of its time in the world, the city's planners created a fortress-like city complete with hundreds of religious structures. The people of Hampi, the core of the ancient city of Vijayanagara, centered their daily life around religious devotion. The land surrounding the development provided fertile soil for farming, rich iron deposits, and natural outlying fortress sites. Those resources contributed to the creation of a highly developed civilization, protected by the military might of the empire.

Why the Vijayanagara empire, possessing such military power, a vigorous economy, powerful religious traditions, and natural defensive features, fell to the Muslim sultanates after only two centuries is puzzling. The Battle of Talikota, in which the Muslim sultanates demolished the armies of Vijayanagar, may hold the key to explaining the fall.


A sentry post, Vijayanagara area

The rulers of the Vijayanagar empire, seated in Vijayanagara, had become complacent and overconfident. They had mistreated their Muslim neighbors, who finally joined a league against them. Although outnumbering the Muslim army 150,000 to 110,000, the Vijayanagar empire fell in a short, intense battle. The Muslim calvary, and younger leaders, proved superior to the Vijayanagar foot soldier based army with elderly generals. Overconfidence and arrogance may have been the reason for the downfall of the Vijayanagar empire and the sack of Vijayanagara.

Vijayanagara Described

Excavations

Recent excavations have unearthed archaeological artifacts dating from the thirrd century B.C.E. to early in the second millennium, documenting evidence from over seven hundred important sites. Those sites include ash mounds, ancient settlements, megalithic cemeteries, temples, and rock art. Those findings show that the Vijayanagar area had been densely settled for a long period before the creation of the empire.

Land

Starting at its outermost fortifications, the principality of Vijayanagar spans from Anegondi in the north to Hospet in the south and covers a total area of 650 km². (Studies conducted by Vijayanagara metropolitan survey concluded that the ancient fortified city with all its walled suburban settlements encompassed that area. Some suburbs had been as big as towns, people still populating the place.Vijayanagara's core, an area of 25 km², includes the Tungabhadra River flowing through rocky terrain with huge boulders piled in massive formations.

In addition to that naturally daunting landscape, builders constructed fortifications surrounding the regal city in several layers. The rocky hillocks made excellent sentinel points for watch towers. South of the river the rocky landscape disappears, replaced by flat cultivable land. Granite boulders provided the raw material for the large and small temples complexes built there. The largest populations settled to the south of the irrigated lands watered by a system of clever ducts and anecut (dams) channeling water to the capital from the river. At its peak, Vijayanagara may have had up to a million residents.

Zoning

For the sake of simplicity, archaeologists divided the capital area into many zones. The Sacred Center and the Royal Center constituted the major two zones. The former, generally spread along the south bank, hosts the highest concentration of religious structures. The Royal Center has been noted for its stately structures, both civil and military. The seat of power of the empire was located at the core of that area.

Islamic Quarter, also sometimes called the Moorish Quarter, sits between the northern slop of the Malyavanta hill towards and the Talarigatta Gate. According to the archaeologists, high-ranking Muslim officers of the king’s court and the military officers stayed in that area.

Legends

Two important legends played an important role in making Hampi (the core area of Vijayanagar) a pilgrim destination for several centuries prior to the Vijayanagara era. One legend describes the marriage of a local Goddess, Pampa, with Virupaksha (Lord Shiva) on the Hemakuta Hill. Thereafter, devotees considered the city an incarnation of Parvati. From Pampa came the name Pampe or (in Kannada) Hampe.

The second legend draws on the Hindu epic, Ramayana. Lord Rama and his brother, Lakshmana, while searching for Sita in the vicinity of the ancient capital of Kishkindha, met Hanuman on Rishyamuka Hill. Rama made a covenant with Sugreeva, the monkey king in exile, to find Sita and get rid of the evil King Vali. The presence of a temple with icons of Lord Rama, Lakshmana and Sugreeva celebrated that agreement. Legend says that Hanuman, the devout follower of Rama, had been born on Anjenadri Hill near the Tungabhadra river facing Hampi. Hence, he received the name Anjaneya. Archaeologists trace the history of Hampi to neolithic settlements while inscriptions confirm that in more recent times the area came under the rule of the Chalukyas, Rashtrakutas, Hoysalas, and finally the tiny kingdom of Kampili.

The legendary association of the area with Lord Virupaksha (Harihara and Bukka Raya associated with the Shaiva faith) and Lord Rama (the personification of the perfect king) caught the attention of the empire's founders. The natural ruggedness and inaccessibility of the area may have factored into the decision to make it the location of the capital of the new empire. At the peak of the empire, Vijayanagara had been known as one of the most beautiful cities in India.A copper plate inscription (Tamarashasana) of Marappa (one of the Sangama brothers) dates to 1346, and traces the Sangama genealogy, identifying the Sangama family deity (gotradhidaivam) as Lord Virupaksha of Hampi Inscriptions attesting to the elevation of Lord Virupaksha to Rashtra devata ("God of the Kingdom") have been found. By the time of Bukka I, the capital had already grown into a large and powerful capital, inscriptions proclaiming, "great Nagari named Vijaya situated in Hemakuta."

Forts and roads

The Vijayanagar empire designed its cities especially to protect the empire from invaders. The city itself stood as a fortress, designed to provide maximum protection. Built of massive stone and earthen walls, hilltop fortresses and watch towers scatter across the length and breadth of the city. Visitors, irrespective of their guild and intention, had to travel through a heavily fortified and protected area before reaching the main urban core. That trek gave them an ample view of the might of the empire. Massive fortifications stood at every entry into the main metropolis, as well as crucial locations surrounding the city including watch posts and bastions located along roads, gates, and hilltops that provided maximum coverage.

The capital served as the political nerve center of the empire as well as a center of commerce and pilgrimage. Envoys from kingdoms, merchants, pilgrims, soldiers, and ordinary people all traveled about in the great city on its extensive network of roads. Archaeologists have identified eighty transportation sites linked by several broad roads about 30 to 60 m wide constituted the major transport routes into the city core. Smaller roads, less than 10 m wide, led to temples, settlements, and irrigation fields. Watch towers, gates, and rest houses monitored all major roadways.

Urban settlements

Royalty, imperial officers, soldiers, agriculturists, craftsman, merchants, and laborers inhabited the greater metropolitan region. Literary sources from the era speak of large military encampments on the city's outskirts. Outside the metropolis, walled towns and villages scattered about the countryside. Some settlements may have been populated by only a few thousand people, while others had ten to fifteen thousand residents. Each settlement hosted multiple shrines and temples. Numerous Vijayanagar period relics have been lost due to the habitation of those settlements by modern day citizens.

Agriculture and craft

While today the city's landscape appears barren, records speak of extensive forests and extensive agriculture. That suggests that the landscape has changed dramatically. Virtually all available arable land had been irrigated using a variety of innovative methods. A significant percentage of the population worked in agriculture, making the city self-sufficient for food. That enabled it to withstand the many long sieges during the empire's three century long existence. Labors dug canals throughout the city to provide a perennial water supply to the narrow strip of fertile land bordering the Tungabhadra River. Farmers still use many of those canals today, though modified with modern technology. Many of the tanks (bunds) created for water storage purposes, like the Kamalapura tank, remain in use. Excavation of the Intensive Survey Area has shown the presence of sixty water reservoir embankments. Numerous other agricultural features such as check dams, erosion control walls and wells have been recorded. A complex agricultural industry, over a complex topography, has been revealed. That provided resources to meet the needs of a diverse population.

Sandur, which formed the southern boundary of the greater metropolitan region, still yields abundant iron and haematite ores. Iron slag and other metallurgical debris have been documented at more than thirty sites. Of those, five sites have been dated to the Vijayanagar period and contain iron smelting workshop

 

As well as being a bustling commercial and military encampment, the metropolitan area had over one hundred and forty sacred sites, making it an important center of religion and religious pilgrimage. Along with temples, numerous sacred images and structures have been recorded in residential and defensive sites. Sacred sites include large temples with towering gopuras, such as the Mallikarjuna temple in the town of Mallappanagudi, located on the main road connecting modern Hospet and Vijayanagara and built in the period of Deva Raya I.Many smaller temples and shrines grace the site. Images of deities carved into boulder and slab surfaces, as well as hero stones (virgal) considered sacred, outnumber the temples. Many sculpted icons of Hanuman, Bhairava, Virabhadra and goddesses in various forms also appear as well as images from folk traditions such as naga stones (snake stones) linked with woman's ritual activities. Tombs associated with Muslim inhabitants of the city exist as well.

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Answered on 04 Feb CBSE/Class 11/Humanities/History Tuition/Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

Describe the events that led to the Non-Cooperation Movement.

Hari Om Sharan

Home Tutor

Non cooperation movement was a significant move in the history of indian independence movement. It was led by mahatma gandhi following the massacre at jallianwala bagh in the year 1919. This movement was kiced off on 1st august 1920. Gandhi's newly experimented ahimsa and truce played an important role... read more

Non cooperation movement was a significant move in the history of indian independence movement. It was led by mahatma gandhi following the massacre at jallianwala bagh in the year 1919. This movement was kiced off on 1st august 1920. Gandhi's newly experimented ahimsa and truce played an important role in this movement. Gandhi's ability to rally thousands of common citizens was first seen on large scale through this movement.

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