Signup as a Tutor

As a tutor you can connect with more than a million students and grow your network.

Shelly Barman photo

Shelly Barman

MVA

Rohini, Delhi, India- 110085.

Phone Verified Email Verified Facebook Verified

Is this listing inaccurate or duplicate? Any other problem?

Please tell us about the problem and we will fix it.

Please describe the problem that you see in this page.

Type the letters as shown below *

Please enter the letters as show below

Are you Looking to Learn?

Overview

Shelly Barman conducts classes in Bengali Speaking, Class I-V Tuition and Class VI-VIII Tuition. Shelly is located in Rohini, Delhi. Shelly takes at students Home and Regular Classes- at her Home. She has 12 years of teaching experience . She is well versed in Bengali, Hindi and English.

Languages Spoken

Bengali, Hindi, English

Address

Rohini, Delhi, India- 110085.

Bengali Speaking classes Overview

Bengali Speaking classes

Years of Experience in Bengali Speaking classes

12

Teaching Experience in detail in Bengali Speaking classes

Bengali language, Bengali Bangla, member of the Indo-Aryan group of the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is spoken by more than 210 million people as a first or second language, with some 100 million Bengali speakers in Bangladesh; about 85 million in India, primarily in the states of West Bengal, Assam, and Tripura; and sizable immigrant communities in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Middle East. It is the state language of Bangladesh and one of the languages officially recognized in the constitution of India. There is general agreement that in the distant past Oriya, Assamese, and Bengali formed a single branch, from which Oriya split off first and Assamese later. This is one reason that the earliest specimens of Bengali language and literature, the Charyapadas (Buddhist mystic songs), are also claimed by speakers of Oriya and Assamese as their own. The Bengali linguists Suniti Kumar Chatterji and Sukumar Sen suggested that Bengali had its origin in the 10th century ce, deriving from Magahi Prakrit (a spoken language) through Magahi Apabhramsha (its written counterpart). The Bengali scholar Muhammad Shahidullah and his followers offered a competing theory, suggesting that the language began in the 7th century ce and developed from spoken and written Gauda (also, respectively, a Prakrit and an Apabhramsha). Although Bengali is an Indo-European language, it has been influenced by other language families prevalent in South Asia, notably the Dravidian, the Austroasiatic, and the Tibeto-Burman families, all of which contributed to Bengali vocabulary and provided the language with some structural forms. In the 1960s and ’70s, Chatterji examined dictionaries from the early 20th century and attributed slightly more than half of the Bengali vocabulary to native words (i.e., naturally modified Sanskrit words, corrupted forms of Sanskrit words, and loanwords from non-Indo-European languages), about 45 percent to unmodified Sanskrit words, and the remainder to foreign words. Dominant in the last group was Persian, which was also the source of some grammatical forms. More recent studies suggest that the use of native and foreign words has been increasing, mainly because of the preference of Bengali speakers for the colloquial style. There are two standard styles in Bengali: the Sadhubhasa (elegant or genteel speech) and the Chaltibhasa (current or colloquial speech). The former was largely shaped by the language of early Bengali poetical works. In the 19th century it became standardized as the literary language and also as the appropriate vehicle for business and personal exchanges. Although it was at times used for oration, Sadhubhasa was not the language of daily communication. Chaltibhasa is based on the cultivated form of the dialects of Kolkata (Calcutta) and its neighbouring small towns on the Bhagirathi River. It has come into literary use since the early 20th century, and by the early 21st century it had become the dominant literary language as well as the standard colloquial form of speech among the educated. The pronouns and verb forms of the Sadhubhasa are contracted in Chaltibhasa. There is also a marked difference in vocabulary. Although distinctions in the use of Bengali are associated with social class, educational level, and religion, the greatest differences are regional. The four main dialects roughly approximate the ancient political divisions of the Bengali-speaking world, known as Radha (West Bengal proper); Pundra, or Varendra (the northern parts of West Bengal and Bangladesh); Kamrupa (northeastern Bangladesh); and Bangla (the dialects of the rest of Bangladesh; see also Bangladesh: history). In addition, two cities, Sylhet and Chittagong, have developed dialects with lexical and phonological characteristics that are mostly unintelligible to other speakers of Bengali. A simple Bengali sentence usually follows subject–object–verb word order. When present, the negative particle comes at the end of the sentence. The copula, or verb linking the subject and predicate, is often omitted. Six cases are generally recognized. Compound verbs, comprising a stem or root and a suffix, are a special feature. There are 3 verb tenses, but their subdivisions make them 10. There are two moods, indicative and imperative, and two numbers, singular and plural. The first, second, and third persons are expressed through six forms because they have both ordinary and honorific referents. Gender is natural, and there is no special declension for feminine and neuter. Adjectives are usually not modified according to the number or case of the nouns they qualify. The Bengali script is derived from Brahmi, one of the two ancient Indian scripts, and particularly from the eastern variety of Brahmi. Bengali script followed a different line of development from that of Devanagari and Oriyan scripts, but the characters of Bengali and Assamese scripts generally coincided. By the 12th century ce the Bengali alphabet was nearly complete, although natural changes continued to take place until the 16th century. Some conscious alterations were also made in the 19th century. Bengali is written from left to right. There are no capital letters. The script is characterized by many conjuncts, upstrokes, downstrokes, and other features that hang from a horizontal line. The punctuation marks, save one, are all taken from 19th-century English. Bengali spelling was more or less standardized through a set of reforms that were initiated by the University of Calcutta in 1936. However, the standardization process continued throughout the 20th and into the early 21st century. For instance, the Bangla Academy in Dhaka prefers a set of alternatives offered by the 1936 reforms, while the Bangla Academy in West Bengal has proposed new reforms. Visva-Bharati, the university founded by the Bengali poet and Nobelist Rabindranath Tagore, has also effected several spelling variations. Finally, some newspapers and publishers have their own house styles. Not surprisingly, these independent efforts to standardize Bengali orthography have helped to create a degree of confusion.

View all Classes

Gallery (12)

contempory art show 2015

face

back canvas

young

work

work

art class

art class

budha

+3 Photos

Documents (1)

art book

Reviews

this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message

No Reviews yet! Be the first one to Review

Answers by Shelly Barman (3)

"What needs keep in mind while starting a new work.?" in   Art and Creativity/Painting

What things do........... concentration need to keep in mind while starting an imagine art concept for drawing... new in this so I would like to ... to keep in concentration need while .. Concentration / UN concentration - Keep Doing - Start - Mind Tools - Any work

1
|
0

"Is interior designing course costly?" in   Home Decor/Interior Designing

not a man

0
|
0

"What is the career scope in interior designing?" in   Home Decor/Interior Designing

yes

0
|
0

Shelly Barman address

x
Bengali Speaking classes

Years of Experience in Bengali Speaking classes

12

Teaching Experience in detail in Bengali Speaking classes

Bengali language, Bengali Bangla, member of the Indo-Aryan group of the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. It is spoken by more than 210 million people as a first or second language, with some 100 million Bengali speakers in Bangladesh; about 85 million in India, primarily in the states of West Bengal, Assam, and Tripura; and sizable immigrant communities in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Middle East. It is the state language of Bangladesh and one of the languages officially recognized in the constitution of India. There is general agreement that in the distant past Oriya, Assamese, and Bengali formed a single branch, from which Oriya split off first and Assamese later. This is one reason that the earliest specimens of Bengali language and literature, the Charyapadas (Buddhist mystic songs), are also claimed by speakers of Oriya and Assamese as their own. The Bengali linguists Suniti Kumar Chatterji and Sukumar Sen suggested that Bengali had its origin in the 10th century ce, deriving from Magahi Prakrit (a spoken language) through Magahi Apabhramsha (its written counterpart). The Bengali scholar Muhammad Shahidullah and his followers offered a competing theory, suggesting that the language began in the 7th century ce and developed from spoken and written Gauda (also, respectively, a Prakrit and an Apabhramsha). Although Bengali is an Indo-European language, it has been influenced by other language families prevalent in South Asia, notably the Dravidian, the Austroasiatic, and the Tibeto-Burman families, all of which contributed to Bengali vocabulary and provided the language with some structural forms. In the 1960s and ’70s, Chatterji examined dictionaries from the early 20th century and attributed slightly more than half of the Bengali vocabulary to native words (i.e., naturally modified Sanskrit words, corrupted forms of Sanskrit words, and loanwords from non-Indo-European languages), about 45 percent to unmodified Sanskrit words, and the remainder to foreign words. Dominant in the last group was Persian, which was also the source of some grammatical forms. More recent studies suggest that the use of native and foreign words has been increasing, mainly because of the preference of Bengali speakers for the colloquial style. There are two standard styles in Bengali: the Sadhubhasa (elegant or genteel speech) and the Chaltibhasa (current or colloquial speech). The former was largely shaped by the language of early Bengali poetical works. In the 19th century it became standardized as the literary language and also as the appropriate vehicle for business and personal exchanges. Although it was at times used for oration, Sadhubhasa was not the language of daily communication. Chaltibhasa is based on the cultivated form of the dialects of Kolkata (Calcutta) and its neighbouring small towns on the Bhagirathi River. It has come into literary use since the early 20th century, and by the early 21st century it had become the dominant literary language as well as the standard colloquial form of speech among the educated. The pronouns and verb forms of the Sadhubhasa are contracted in Chaltibhasa. There is also a marked difference in vocabulary. Although distinctions in the use of Bengali are associated with social class, educational level, and religion, the greatest differences are regional. The four main dialects roughly approximate the ancient political divisions of the Bengali-speaking world, known as Radha (West Bengal proper); Pundra, or Varendra (the northern parts of West Bengal and Bangladesh); Kamrupa (northeastern Bangladesh); and Bangla (the dialects of the rest of Bangladesh; see also Bangladesh: history). In addition, two cities, Sylhet and Chittagong, have developed dialects with lexical and phonological characteristics that are mostly unintelligible to other speakers of Bengali. A simple Bengali sentence usually follows subject–object–verb word order. When present, the negative particle comes at the end of the sentence. The copula, or verb linking the subject and predicate, is often omitted. Six cases are generally recognized. Compound verbs, comprising a stem or root and a suffix, are a special feature. There are 3 verb tenses, but their subdivisions make them 10. There are two moods, indicative and imperative, and two numbers, singular and plural. The first, second, and third persons are expressed through six forms because they have both ordinary and honorific referents. Gender is natural, and there is no special declension for feminine and neuter. Adjectives are usually not modified according to the number or case of the nouns they qualify. The Bengali script is derived from Brahmi, one of the two ancient Indian scripts, and particularly from the eastern variety of Brahmi. Bengali script followed a different line of development from that of Devanagari and Oriyan scripts, but the characters of Bengali and Assamese scripts generally coincided. By the 12th century ce the Bengali alphabet was nearly complete, although natural changes continued to take place until the 16th century. Some conscious alterations were also made in the 19th century. Bengali is written from left to right. There are no capital letters. The script is characterized by many conjuncts, upstrokes, downstrokes, and other features that hang from a horizontal line. The punctuation marks, save one, are all taken from 19th-century English. Bengali spelling was more or less standardized through a set of reforms that were initiated by the University of Calcutta in 1936. However, the standardization process continued throughout the 20th and into the early 21st century. For instance, the Bangla Academy in Dhaka prefers a set of alternatives offered by the 1936 reforms, while the Bangla Academy in West Bengal has proposed new reforms. Visva-Bharati, the university founded by the Bengali poet and Nobelist Rabindranath Tagore, has also effected several spelling variations. Finally, some newspapers and publishers have their own house styles. Not surprisingly, these independent efforts to standardize Bengali orthography have helped to create a degree of confusion.

Drawing Classes

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Drawing Classes

12

Teaching Experience in detail in Drawing Classes

To improve any of your drawings, you will need to understand and evaluate this drawing first. It can be incredibly challenging to be objective about your own drawing as it is often difficult to see the faults in a drawing you have been looking at for hours. If you had seen the faults earlier, you would have corrected them. It is therefore not advisable to try to evaluate a drawing too soon after you have completed it or while it is right in front of you. Get up, walk around, have a cup of coffee and then go back and look at it and see if you find anything new. Try putting your drawing away for a couple of weeks or even months and then go back and look at it.

Fine Arts Classes

Years of Experience in Fine Arts Classes

12

Teaching Experience in detail in Fine Arts Classes

Fine Art Tips goes "behind the paintings" to show how 24 of today's top artists transform dabs of paint into incredible still lifes, landscapes, portraits and wildlife art. Along the way, they generously share practical, real-world tips on everything from evoking the illusion of sparkling water to professional networking. art (as painting, sculpture, or music) concerned primarily with the creation of beautiful objects —usually used in plural objects of fine art an activity requiring a fine skill Fine Art is made by artists and exhibited in art galleries and museums. Fine art may consist of paintings, sculptures, drawings, printmaking, photography, performance, installation, sound art, ephemeral and conceptual art, digital and video art. Fine Art is also called the Visual Arts.

Painting Classes

Teaches

Oil Painting, Glass Painting, Warli Painting, Acrylic Painting, Mural Painting, Fabric Painting, Water color Painting, Madhubani Painting

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Painting Classes

12

Teaching Experience in detail in Painting Classes

Simply put, your teaching statement is a concise description (no more than a page) of the central ideas behind your teaching. When writing your teaching statement, make clear why, how, and what you teach. It should be one to two pages in length. It is not an article on teaching and learning but rather a statement that describes your teaching experiences and explains your teaching practices. Keep in mind potential readers and the questions they're likely to have as they read your statement. Here are four components of your teaching that you'll want to address in your teaching statement: 1.Your goals for student learning. What do you want students to be able to do or learn? Do you want students to learn the fundamental concepts, develop life-long learning skills or problem-solving strategies? What should they be able to do after they've taken a class from you? You can speak to a specific course or talk more generally about student learning. Do you have different goals for freshmen, for majors or non-majors? 2.The methods you use to achieve these goals. What teaching strategies do you use and why? How do you actively involve students in their own learning? You should be able to connect learning theory and curriculum design, give examples of specific strategies or learning exercises, discuss group work or collaborative learning techniques, and propose new ideas you have for teaching in your area. You might discuss how different learning environments or students' learning styles influence your teaching. 3.The methods you use to assess student learning. How do you know students are learning what you want them to learn? How do you assess and evaluate student learning (and your teaching)? What evidence do you have? How do your assessment methods relate to student learning and your stated learning objectives? How do you use student evaluations to inform your teaching? 4.Your plans for developing or improving your teaching. Why is teaching important to you? What do you get out of it? How do you assess your teaching? Briefly describe the courses you are teaching or have taught in the recent past, including the number of credit hours, whether the course was required or elective, the number of students, and whether they were graduate or undergraduate. Teaching activities outside the classroom, such as advising undergraduate students, supervising students engaged in undergraduate research, and otherwise mentoring students also are important to include. By describing your teaching roles and responsibilities, you provide a context for the reader and set the stage for the main points you'll be making about your teaching. If you haven't taught much and don't have a collection of course materials from which you can choose, provide a list of three to five courses you anticipate teaching with a brief paragraph of each describing the nature of the course, your objectives for student learning, and perhaps some of the readings or assignments you would use. Don't worry about being too exact or stress over whether you'd actually teach the course the way you described. You won't be held to these descriptions. The goal is to convey your overall approach to teaching and the processes you'd use to design an intro course or a seminar in your discipline.

Nursery-KG Tuition

Experience in School or College

Subject

English, Mathematics, Drawing, EVS

Taught in School or College

Yes

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Nursery-KG Tuition

7

Class VI-VIII Tuition

Board

State, International Baccalaureate, IGCSE, CBSE

IB Subjects taught

Mathematics, Arts

CBSE Subjects taught

Mathematics, Bengali

ICSE Subjects taught

IGCSE Subjects taught

Mathematics

Experience in School or College

Taught in School or College

Yes

State Syllabus Subjects taught

Mathematics

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Class VI-VIII Tuition

5

Class I-V Tuition

Board

State, CBSE

IB Subjects taught

CBSE Subjects taught

English, Hindi, Science, Mathematics, Bengali, EVS

ICSE Subjects taught

IGCSE Subjects taught

Experience in School or College

Taught in School or College

Yes

State Syllabus Subjects taught

Social Science, Mathematics, EVS

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Class I-V Tuition

6

Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

Board

CBSE, State

CBSE Subjects taught

History

Experience in School or College

Taught in School or College

Yes

State Syllabus Subjects taught

Hindi, History

Class Location

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Class XI-XII Tuition (PUC)

6

this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message this is test message

No Reviews yet! Be the first one to Review

"What needs keep in mind while starting a new work.?" in   Art and Creativity/Painting

What things do........... concentration need to keep in mind while starting an imagine art concept for drawing... new in this so I would like to ... to keep in concentration need while .. Concentration / UN concentration - Keep Doing - Start - Mind Tools - Any work

1
|
0

"Is interior designing course costly?" in   Home Decor/Interior Designing

not a man

0
|
0

"What is the career scope in interior designing?" in   Home Decor/Interior Designing

yes

0
|
0

Shelly Barman conducts classes in Bengali Speaking, Class I-V Tuition and Class VI-VIII Tuition. Shelly is located in Rohini, Delhi. Shelly takes at students Home and Regular Classes- at her Home. She has 12 years of teaching experience . She is well versed in Bengali, Hindi and English.

Share this Profile

Similar Profiles

Gopal S. photo

Gopal S.

Gopal S. photo Rohini, Delhi

M.Sc. degree holder in mathematics with 20 years experience in teaching industry. Deep knowledge of Mathematics and strong...


Nitesh R. photo

Nitesh R.

Nitesh R. photo Rohini, Delhi

More than 9 years experience in teaching students from class 9 to 12 as per CBSE syllabus in subjects - Mathematics, Science,...


Gufran M. photo

Gufran M.

Gufran M. photo Rohini, Delhi

I have completed MSc in mathematics from AMU( central university) in 2008 and then cleared NET exam for lecturer ship and...


Abhishek K. photo

Abhishek K.

Abhishek K. photo Rohini, Delhi

534247


Rajesh K. photo

Rajesh K.

Rajesh K. photo Rohini, Delhi

I have two years of experience


Jaspreet S. photo

Jaspreet S.

Jaspreet S. photo Rohini, Delhi

I am a house wife. This time i want to start my carrier as a teacher for nursery to Vth class students. This time I am giving...


Manik L. photo

Manik L.

Manik L. photo Rohini, Delhi

I am doing my Masters in Business Economics from DU. i got 95% in my 12th boards in 2009-10 Roll No.-6236942


Balvinder K photo

Balvinder K

Balvinder K photo Rohini, Delhi

I have 2 year experience of teaching,


Yogesh S. photo

Yogesh S.

Yogesh S. photo Rohini, Delhi

I am working as a Assistant Professor in an engineering college in Delhi.I have total experience of 9 years. I am teaching...


Reply to 's review

Enter your reply*

1500/1500

Please enter your reply

Your reply should contain a minimum of 10 characters

Your reply has been successfully submitted.