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Tanmoy Majumder

Dum Dum, Kolkata, India - 700030

Tanmoy Majumder Art and Craft trainer in Kolkata

Tanmoy Majumder

Teacher:Art and Craft,Painting,Drawing,BFA,MFA,Applied...

Dum Dum, Kolkata, India - 700030.

27 Students taught

5.0

UrbanPro Rating
Referral Discount: Get ₹ 500 off when you make a payment to start classes. Get started by Booking a Demo.

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Overview

I am an energetic and responsible ART TEACHER for those passionate students who want to take admission in Art Colleges and also give the possibilities to take proper guidance of painting , applied art( commercial) design, Graphics - Printmaking, and Art History ( with proper notes and slides according to the syllabus of art college ), from Art College Bachelors 1st semester to Masters Last semester. Also teaching for UGC NET ( Visual Arts ) including Ist paper . Beginners of all ages are also welcome for exploring various mediums and easiest way to learn ART like Professionals.

Languages Spoken

Bengali Mother Tongue (Native)

Hindi Proficient

English Proficient

Education

Rabindra Bharati University Pursuing

PhD in Visual Arts

Rabindra Bharati University 2008

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA - BVA)

Visva-Bharati University 2010

Master of Fine Arts (MFA - MVA)

University Grants Commission 2015

NET

Address

Dum Dum, Kolkata, India - 700030

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Art and Craft classes

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Art and Craft classes

16

Age groups catered to

10 yrs to 25 yrs, Below 10 yrs, Above 25 yrs

Gallery (31)

Giraffe

Acrylic painting for students

Drama Stage Decoration

The girl with her sketchbook ( brush...

The dancer ( brush pen)

Creative makeup

Simple drawing on student s copy...

Simple pencil drawing on student...

Simple drawing on student s copy...

Benaras Ghat with acrylic (painted...

Fun non-permanent tattoo painting...

Digital painting

Digital painting

+22 Photos

Reviews (4)

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5.0 out of 5.0 4 reviews

Tanmoy Majumder https://s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/tv-prod/member/photo/7118793-small.jpg Dum Dum
5.0054
Tanmoy Majumder
U

"I have been learning drawing with Tanmoy sir since last month and it has been a really great experience. His teaching is very fluent and student-friendly. I will definitely recommend people who have not formally learnt drawing previously to learn from him. "

Tanmoy Majumder
P

"Teaches me very well and made me understand where the mistake I have made in my drawing .He is a kind and sweet teacher. "

Tanmoy Majumder
A

"Art is nothing but only the reflection of your inner eyesight and you can feel it here.Totally awesome and outstanding. "

Tanmoy Majumder
K

"Very amazing tutor and guide. A best class where your ideas are shaped the way you want. Best place to learn your crafts and painting. Convenient language and easy to follow instructions."

Have you attended any class with Tanmoy? Write a Review

FAQs

1. Which of the age groups do you cater to?

10 yrs to 25 yrs, Below 10 yrs and Above 25 yrs

2. Which classes do you teach?

I teach Advanced Placement Tests Coaching, Art and Craft, BFA Tuition, Drawing, Painting and UGC NET Exam Coaching Classes.

3. Do you provide a demo class?

Yes, I provide a free demo class.

4. How many years of experience do you have?

I have been teaching for 16 years.

Answers by Tanmoy (4)

Answered on 09/12/2019 Tuition

The most significant alternative to the work of Piaget has been the information-processing approach, which uses the computer as a model to provide new insight into how the human mind receives, stores, retrieves and uses information. Researchers using information-processing theory to study cognitive development... ...more

The most significant alternative to the work of Piaget has been the information-processing approach, which uses the computer as a model to provide new insight into how the human mind receives, stores, retrieves and uses information. Researchers using information-processing theory to study cognitive development in children have focused on areas such as the gradual improvements in children's ability to take in information and focus selectively on certain parts of it and their increasing attention spans and capacity for memory storage. For example, researchers have found that the superior memory skills of older children are due in part to memorization strategies, such as repeating items to memorize them or dividing them into categories.

Infancy

As soon as they are born, infants begin learning to use their senses to explore the world around them. Most newborns can focus on and follow moving objects, distinguish the pitch and volume of sound, see all colours and distinguish their hue and brightness, and start anticipating events, such as sucking at the sight of a nipple. By three months old, infants can recognize faces; imitate the facial expressions of others, such as smiling and frowning; and respond to familiar sounds.

At six months of age, babies are just beginning to understand how the world around them works. They imitate sounds, enjoy hearing their voice, recognize parents, fear strangers, distinguish between animate and inanimate objects, and base distance on the size of an object. They also realize that if they drop an object, they can pick it up again. At four to seven months, babies can recognize their names.

By nine months, infants can imitate gestures and actions, experiment with the physical properties of objects, understand simple words such as "no," and understand that an object still exists even when they cannot see it. They also begin to test parental responses to their behaviour, such as throwing food on the floor. They remember the reaction and recheck the parents to see if they get the same answer.

At 12 months of age, babies can follow a fast-moving object; can speak two to fours words, including "mama" and "papa"; imitate animal sounds; associate names with objects; develop attachments to objects, such as a toy or blanket; and experience separation anxiety when away from their parents. By 18 months of age, babies can understand about 10–50 words; identify body parts; feel a sense of ownership by using the word "my" with certain people or objects; and can follow directions that involve two different tasks, such as picking up toys and putting them in a box.

Toddlerhood

Between 18 months to three years of age, toddlers have reached the "sensorimotor" stage of Piaget's theory of cognitive development that involves initial thought. For instance, they understand the permanence of objects and people, visually follow the displacement of objects, and begin to use instruments and tools. Toddlers start to strive for more independence, which can present challenges to parents concerned about their safety. They also understand discipline and what behaviour is appropriate and inappropriate, and they understand the concepts of words like "please" and "thank you."

Two-year-olds should be able to understand 100 to 150 words and start adding about ten new words per day. Toddlers also have a better understanding of emotions, such as love, trust, and fear. They begin to understand some of the ordinary aspects of everyday life, such as shopping for food, telling time, and being read to.

Preschool

Preschoolers, ages three to six, should be at the "preoperational" stage of Piaget's cognitive development theory, meaning they are using their imagery and memory skills. They should be conditioned to learning and memorizing, and their view of the world usually is very self-centred. Preschoolers typically have also developed their social interaction skills, such as playing and cooperating with other children their age. It is usual for preschoolers to test the limits of their cognitive abilities, and they learn negative concepts and actions, such as talking back to adults, lying, and bullying. Other cognitive developments in preschoolers are developing an increased attention span, learning to read, and establishing structured routines, such as doing household chores.

School-age

Younger school-age children, six to 12 years old, should be at the "concrete operations" stage of Piaget's cognitive development theory, characterized by the ability to use logical and coherent actions in thinking and solving problems. They understand the concepts of permanence and conservation by learning that volume, weight, and numbers may remain constant despite changes in outward appearance. These children should be able to build on past experiences, using them to explain why some things happen. Their attention span should increase with age, from being able to focus on a task for about 15 minutes at age six to an hour by age nine.

Adolescents, ages 12 through 18, should be at the "formal operations" stage of Piaget's cognitive development theory. It is characterized by increased independence for thinking through problems and situations. Adolescents should be able to understand pure abstractions, such as philosophy and higher math concepts. During this age, children should be able to learn and apply general information needed to adapt to specific situations. They should also be able to determine the accurate knowledge and skills necessary for an occupation. A significant component of the passage through adolescence is a cognitive transition. Compared to children, adolescents think in ways that are more advanced, more efficient, and generally more complex. This ability can be seen in five ways.

First, during adolescence, individuals become better able than children to think about what is possible, instead of limiting their thought to what is real. Whereas children's thinking is oriented to the here and now—that is, to things and events that they can observe directly—adolescents can consider what they see against a backdrop of what is possible; they can think hypothetically.

Second, during the passage into adolescence, individuals become better able to think about abstract ideas. For example, adolescents find it easier than children to comprehend the sorts of higher-order, abstract logic inherent in puns, proverbs, metaphors, and analogies. The adolescent's more exceptional facility with abstract thinking also permits the application of advanced reasoning and logical processes to social and ideological matters. This is seen in the adolescent's increased facility and interest in thinking about interpersonal relationships, politics, philosophy, religion, and morality.

Third, during adolescence, individuals begin thinking more often about the process of thinking itself, or metacognition. As a result, adolescents may display increased introspection and self-consciousness. Although improvements in metacognitive abilities provide significant intellectual advantages, one potentially harmful byproduct of these advances is the tendency for adolescents to develop a sort of egocentrism or intense preoccupation with the self.

 

 

 

Cognitive development is the construction of thought processes, including remembering, problem-solving, and decision-making, from childhood through adolescence to adulthood.

Description

It was once believed that infants could not think or form complex ideas and remained without cognition until they learned the language. It is now known that babies are aware of their surroundings and interested in exploration from the time they are born. From birth, babies begin to learn actively. They gather, sort, and process information from around them, using the data to develop perception and thinking skills.

Cognitive development refers to how a person perceives, thinks, and gains an understanding of his or her world through the interaction of genetic and learned factors. Among the areas of cognitive development are information processing, intelligence, reasoning, language development and memory.

Historically, the cognitive development of children has been studied in a variety of ways. The oldest is through intelligence tests, such as the widely used Stanford Binet Intelligence Quotient (IQ) test first adopted for use in the United States by psychologist Lewis Terman (1877–1956) in 1916 from a French model pioneered in 1905. IQ scoring is based on the concept of "mental age," according to which the scores of a child of average intelligence match his or her age. In contrast, a gifted child's performance is comparable to that of an older child, and a slow learner's scores are similar to those of a younger child. IQ tests are widely used in the United States. Still, they have come under increasing criticism for defining intelligence too narrowly and for being biased about race and gender.

In contrast to the emphasis placed on a child's native abilities by intelligence testing, learning theory grew out of work by behaviourist researchers such as John Watson (1878–1958) and B. F. Skinner (1904–1990), who argued that children are completely malleable. Learning theory focuses on the role of environmental factors in shaping the intelligence of children, especially on a child's ability to learn by having certain behaviours rewarded and others discouraged.

Piaget's theory of cognitive development

The most well-known and influential theory of cognitive development is that of French psychologist Jean Piaget (1896–1980). Piaget's theory, first published in 1952, grew out of decades of extensive observation of children, including his own, in their natural environments as opposed to the laboratory experiments of the behaviourists. Although Piaget was interested in how children reacted to their situation, he proposed a more active role for them than that suggested by learning theory. He envisioned a child's knowledge as composed of schemas, basic units of education used to organize past experiences and serve as a basis for understanding new ones.

Schemas are continually being modified by two complementary processes that Piaget termed assimilation and accommodation. Adaptation refers to the process of taking in new information by incorporating it into an existing schema. In other words, people assimilate new experiences by relating them to things they already know. On the other hand, accommodation is what happens when the schema itself changes to accommodate new knowledge. According to Piaget, cognitive development involves an ongoing attempt to achieve a balance between assimilation and accommodation that he termed equilibration.

At the centre of Piaget's theory is the principle that cognitive development occurs in a series of four distinct, universal stages, each characterized by increasingly sophisticated and abstract levels of thought. These stages always occur in the same order, and each builds on what was learned in the previous step. They are as follows:

  • Sensorimotor stage (infancy): In this period, which has six sub-stages, intelligence is demonstrated through motor activity without the use of symbols. Knowledge of the world is limited but developing because it is based on physical interactions and experiences. Children acquire object permanence at about seven months of age (memory). Physical development (mobility) allows the child to begin developing new intellectual abilities. Some symbolic (language) abilities are produced at the end of this stage.
  • Preoperational stage (toddlerhood and early childhood): In this period, which has two sub-stages, intelligence is demonstrated through the use of symbols, language use matures, and memory and imagination are developed, but thinking is done in a non-logical, non-reversible manner. Egocentric thinking predominates.
  • Concrete operational stage (elementary and early adolescence): In this stage, characterized by seven types of conservation (number, length, liquid, mass, weight, area, and volume), intelligence is demonstrated through logical and systematic manipulation of symbols related to concrete objects. Operational thinking develops (mental actions that are reversible). Egocentric thought diminishes.
  • Formal operational stage (adolescence and adulthood): In this stage, intelligence is demonstrated through the logical use of symbols related to abstract concepts. Early in the period, there is a return to egocentric thought. Only 35 per cent of high school graduates in industrialized countries obtain formal operations; many people do not think formally during adulthood.
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Answered on 20/11/2019 Art and Creativity/Drawing/Intermediate IT Courses/Animation & Multimedia/Advanced Animation IT Courses/Animation & Multimedia/3D Animation +3 IT Courses/Animation & Multimedia/2D Animation IT Courses/E-Learning Animation IT Courses/Maya 3D Animation less

The best thing is you learn the basic drawing and perspective first. From any reputed art school or college. Otherwise, only technical knowledge wouldn't make you creative or unique. After the underlying sense of art is grown, every awesome thing is possible whether it's commercial or creative .thanks... ...more

The best thing is you learn the basic drawing and perspective first. From any reputed art school or college. Otherwise, only technical knowledge wouldn't make you creative or unique. After the underlying sense of art is grown, every awesome thing is possible whether it's commercial or creative .
thanks a lot, Riyank

take care

.......Tanmoy

Answers 13 Comments
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Answered on 05/11/2019 Tuition

Please Learn CA for better opportunities, and you'll get the coaching class in Bhawanipore, Kolkata
Answers 243 Comments
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Answered on 05/11/2019 Art and Creativity/Drawing/Intermediate

Just try to observe the drawing pattern and colour minutely as per your reference. If you're a beginner, you can make graphs on your canvas/paper. Otherwise, you can also trace, hope you'll find the essential things in my answer. I'm uploading one painting done by my student, you'll understand well,... ...more

Just try to observe the drawing pattern and colour minutely as per your reference. If you're a beginner, you can make graphs on your canvas/paper. Otherwise, you can also trace, hope you'll find the essential things in my answer. I'm uploading one painting done by my student, you'll understand well, thank you:)

Answers 4 Comments
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Art and Craft classes 5.0

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Art and Craft classes

16

Age groups catered to

10 yrs to 25 yrs, Below 10 yrs, Above 25 yrs

UGC NET Exam Coaching classes 5.0

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

I am willing to Travel

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in UGC NET Exam Coaching classes

14

UGC_NET_Paper_I_Subjects

Teaching Aptitude, Reading Comprehension, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Data Interpretation, Reasoning (Including Mathematical), Logical Reasoning, People and Environment, Research Aptitude, Higher Education system: Governance, Policy and Administration, Communication

UGC_NET_Papers

Paper I, Paper II / Paper III

Subject

Visual Art

Teaching Experience in detail in UGC NET Exam Coaching classes

BFA Tuition 5.0

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in BFA Tuition

7

Taught in School or College

Yes

Painting Classes 5.0

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Painting Classes

14

Age groups catered to

10 yrs to 25 yrs, Below 10 yrs, Above 25 yrs

Teaches

Oil Painting, Mural Painting, Fabric Painting, Glass Painting, Tanjore Painting, Acrylic Painting, Madhubani Painting, Warli Painting, Canvas Painting, Water color Painting

Teaching Experience in detail in Painting Classes

Any type of art and painting of studen’s choice within a framework and time. Please call me for home ( need a batch of minimum 5 students , if you wish to continue the coaching with very low remuneration) and my place .

Advanced Placement Tests Coaching classes 5.0

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Advanced Placement Tests Coaching classes

9

AP subjects catered to

Art History

Teaching Experience in detail in Advanced Placement Tests Coaching classes

I teach art history from bfa/bva first year - mfa/mva final year ( according to the syllabus) with english or bengali notes and slideshow + demonstration. And also teach for admission test and any competitive exam like ssc ,ugc net, kv, navodaya school test- and many others of same category..With very low remuneration. Please contact me if you wish ( I also provide and teach graphics studio and any practical 2d mediums of art lessons)

Drawing Classes 5.0

Class Location

Online (video chat via skype, google hangout etc)

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Drawing Classes

17

Age groups catered to

10 yrs to 25 yrs, Below 10 yrs, Above 25 yrs

Teaches

Portrait Drawing, Cartoon Drawing, Anime Drawing

Teaching Experience in detail in Drawing Classes

As an enthusiastic art teacher at secondary school, love to teach children. Have equal experience and passion to teach elder students too. proper guideline and scientific course design with friendly behaviour is the main thing I always give the first preference. Teaching highly realistic, cartoon, anime, doodle, character design, portrait, drawing for science, large scale drawing, composition for admission in art college and the best thing is the 'complete drawing course for the beginner' from very starting point to the unbelievable state of drawing within 6 months. Everything cannot be possible to explain about my teaching , for more information or requirement , please contact me. Thank you. Tanmoy Majumder MFA (Vista-Bharati University), PhD (Rabindra Bharati University)

Courses in Drawing Classes

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5.0 out of 5.0 4 reviews

Tanmoy Majumder
U

"I have been learning drawing with Tanmoy sir since last month and it has been a really great experience. His teaching is very fluent and student-friendly. I will definitely recommend people who have not formally learnt drawing previously to learn from him. "

Tanmoy Majumder
P

"Teaches me very well and made me understand where the mistake I have made in my drawing .He is a kind and sweet teacher. "

Tanmoy Majumder
A

"Art is nothing but only the reflection of your inner eyesight and you can feel it here.Totally awesome and outstanding. "

Tanmoy Majumder
K

"Very amazing tutor and guide. A best class where your ideas are shaped the way you want. Best place to learn your crafts and painting. Convenient language and easy to follow instructions."

Have you attended any class with Tanmoy? Write a Review

Answers by Tanmoy (4)

Answered on 09/12/2019 Tuition

The most significant alternative to the work of Piaget has been the information-processing approach, which uses the computer as a model to provide new insight into how the human mind receives, stores, retrieves and uses information. Researchers using information-processing theory to study cognitive development... ...more

The most significant alternative to the work of Piaget has been the information-processing approach, which uses the computer as a model to provide new insight into how the human mind receives, stores, retrieves and uses information. Researchers using information-processing theory to study cognitive development in children have focused on areas such as the gradual improvements in children's ability to take in information and focus selectively on certain parts of it and their increasing attention spans and capacity for memory storage. For example, researchers have found that the superior memory skills of older children are due in part to memorization strategies, such as repeating items to memorize them or dividing them into categories.

Infancy

As soon as they are born, infants begin learning to use their senses to explore the world around them. Most newborns can focus on and follow moving objects, distinguish the pitch and volume of sound, see all colours and distinguish their hue and brightness, and start anticipating events, such as sucking at the sight of a nipple. By three months old, infants can recognize faces; imitate the facial expressions of others, such as smiling and frowning; and respond to familiar sounds.

At six months of age, babies are just beginning to understand how the world around them works. They imitate sounds, enjoy hearing their voice, recognize parents, fear strangers, distinguish between animate and inanimate objects, and base distance on the size of an object. They also realize that if they drop an object, they can pick it up again. At four to seven months, babies can recognize their names.

By nine months, infants can imitate gestures and actions, experiment with the physical properties of objects, understand simple words such as "no," and understand that an object still exists even when they cannot see it. They also begin to test parental responses to their behaviour, such as throwing food on the floor. They remember the reaction and recheck the parents to see if they get the same answer.

At 12 months of age, babies can follow a fast-moving object; can speak two to fours words, including "mama" and "papa"; imitate animal sounds; associate names with objects; develop attachments to objects, such as a toy or blanket; and experience separation anxiety when away from their parents. By 18 months of age, babies can understand about 10–50 words; identify body parts; feel a sense of ownership by using the word "my" with certain people or objects; and can follow directions that involve two different tasks, such as picking up toys and putting them in a box.

Toddlerhood

Between 18 months to three years of age, toddlers have reached the "sensorimotor" stage of Piaget's theory of cognitive development that involves initial thought. For instance, they understand the permanence of objects and people, visually follow the displacement of objects, and begin to use instruments and tools. Toddlers start to strive for more independence, which can present challenges to parents concerned about their safety. They also understand discipline and what behaviour is appropriate and inappropriate, and they understand the concepts of words like "please" and "thank you."

Two-year-olds should be able to understand 100 to 150 words and start adding about ten new words per day. Toddlers also have a better understanding of emotions, such as love, trust, and fear. They begin to understand some of the ordinary aspects of everyday life, such as shopping for food, telling time, and being read to.

Preschool

Preschoolers, ages three to six, should be at the "preoperational" stage of Piaget's cognitive development theory, meaning they are using their imagery and memory skills. They should be conditioned to learning and memorizing, and their view of the world usually is very self-centred. Preschoolers typically have also developed their social interaction skills, such as playing and cooperating with other children their age. It is usual for preschoolers to test the limits of their cognitive abilities, and they learn negative concepts and actions, such as talking back to adults, lying, and bullying. Other cognitive developments in preschoolers are developing an increased attention span, learning to read, and establishing structured routines, such as doing household chores.

School-age

Younger school-age children, six to 12 years old, should be at the "concrete operations" stage of Piaget's cognitive development theory, characterized by the ability to use logical and coherent actions in thinking and solving problems. They understand the concepts of permanence and conservation by learning that volume, weight, and numbers may remain constant despite changes in outward appearance. These children should be able to build on past experiences, using them to explain why some things happen. Their attention span should increase with age, from being able to focus on a task for about 15 minutes at age six to an hour by age nine.

Adolescents, ages 12 through 18, should be at the "formal operations" stage of Piaget's cognitive development theory. It is characterized by increased independence for thinking through problems and situations. Adolescents should be able to understand pure abstractions, such as philosophy and higher math concepts. During this age, children should be able to learn and apply general information needed to adapt to specific situations. They should also be able to determine the accurate knowledge and skills necessary for an occupation. A significant component of the passage through adolescence is a cognitive transition. Compared to children, adolescents think in ways that are more advanced, more efficient, and generally more complex. This ability can be seen in five ways.

First, during adolescence, individuals become better able than children to think about what is possible, instead of limiting their thought to what is real. Whereas children's thinking is oriented to the here and now—that is, to things and events that they can observe directly—adolescents can consider what they see against a backdrop of what is possible; they can think hypothetically.

Second, during the passage into adolescence, individuals become better able to think about abstract ideas. For example, adolescents find it easier than children to comprehend the sorts of higher-order, abstract logic inherent in puns, proverbs, metaphors, and analogies. The adolescent's more exceptional facility with abstract thinking also permits the application of advanced reasoning and logical processes to social and ideological matters. This is seen in the adolescent's increased facility and interest in thinking about interpersonal relationships, politics, philosophy, religion, and morality.

Third, during adolescence, individuals begin thinking more often about the process of thinking itself, or metacognition. As a result, adolescents may display increased introspection and self-consciousness. Although improvements in metacognitive abilities provide significant intellectual advantages, one potentially harmful byproduct of these advances is the tendency for adolescents to develop a sort of egocentrism or intense preoccupation with the self.

 

 

 

Cognitive development is the construction of thought processes, including remembering, problem-solving, and decision-making, from childhood through adolescence to adulthood.

Description

It was once believed that infants could not think or form complex ideas and remained without cognition until they learned the language. It is now known that babies are aware of their surroundings and interested in exploration from the time they are born. From birth, babies begin to learn actively. They gather, sort, and process information from around them, using the data to develop perception and thinking skills.

Cognitive development refers to how a person perceives, thinks, and gains an understanding of his or her world through the interaction of genetic and learned factors. Among the areas of cognitive development are information processing, intelligence, reasoning, language development and memory.

Historically, the cognitive development of children has been studied in a variety of ways. The oldest is through intelligence tests, such as the widely used Stanford Binet Intelligence Quotient (IQ) test first adopted for use in the United States by psychologist Lewis Terman (1877–1956) in 1916 from a French model pioneered in 1905. IQ scoring is based on the concept of "mental age," according to which the scores of a child of average intelligence match his or her age. In contrast, a gifted child's performance is comparable to that of an older child, and a slow learner's scores are similar to those of a younger child. IQ tests are widely used in the United States. Still, they have come under increasing criticism for defining intelligence too narrowly and for being biased about race and gender.

In contrast to the emphasis placed on a child's native abilities by intelligence testing, learning theory grew out of work by behaviourist researchers such as John Watson (1878–1958) and B. F. Skinner (1904–1990), who argued that children are completely malleable. Learning theory focuses on the role of environmental factors in shaping the intelligence of children, especially on a child's ability to learn by having certain behaviours rewarded and others discouraged.

Piaget's theory of cognitive development

The most well-known and influential theory of cognitive development is that of French psychologist Jean Piaget (1896–1980). Piaget's theory, first published in 1952, grew out of decades of extensive observation of children, including his own, in their natural environments as opposed to the laboratory experiments of the behaviourists. Although Piaget was interested in how children reacted to their situation, he proposed a more active role for them than that suggested by learning theory. He envisioned a child's knowledge as composed of schemas, basic units of education used to organize past experiences and serve as a basis for understanding new ones.

Schemas are continually being modified by two complementary processes that Piaget termed assimilation and accommodation. Adaptation refers to the process of taking in new information by incorporating it into an existing schema. In other words, people assimilate new experiences by relating them to things they already know. On the other hand, accommodation is what happens when the schema itself changes to accommodate new knowledge. According to Piaget, cognitive development involves an ongoing attempt to achieve a balance between assimilation and accommodation that he termed equilibration.

At the centre of Piaget's theory is the principle that cognitive development occurs in a series of four distinct, universal stages, each characterized by increasingly sophisticated and abstract levels of thought. These stages always occur in the same order, and each builds on what was learned in the previous step. They are as follows:

  • Sensorimotor stage (infancy): In this period, which has six sub-stages, intelligence is demonstrated through motor activity without the use of symbols. Knowledge of the world is limited but developing because it is based on physical interactions and experiences. Children acquire object permanence at about seven months of age (memory). Physical development (mobility) allows the child to begin developing new intellectual abilities. Some symbolic (language) abilities are produced at the end of this stage.
  • Preoperational stage (toddlerhood and early childhood): In this period, which has two sub-stages, intelligence is demonstrated through the use of symbols, language use matures, and memory and imagination are developed, but thinking is done in a non-logical, non-reversible manner. Egocentric thinking predominates.
  • Concrete operational stage (elementary and early adolescence): In this stage, characterized by seven types of conservation (number, length, liquid, mass, weight, area, and volume), intelligence is demonstrated through logical and systematic manipulation of symbols related to concrete objects. Operational thinking develops (mental actions that are reversible). Egocentric thought diminishes.
  • Formal operational stage (adolescence and adulthood): In this stage, intelligence is demonstrated through the logical use of symbols related to abstract concepts. Early in the period, there is a return to egocentric thought. Only 35 per cent of high school graduates in industrialized countries obtain formal operations; many people do not think formally during adulthood.
Answers 274 Comments
Dislike Bookmark

Answered on 20/11/2019 Art and Creativity/Drawing/Intermediate IT Courses/Animation & Multimedia/Advanced Animation IT Courses/Animation & Multimedia/3D Animation +3 IT Courses/Animation & Multimedia/2D Animation IT Courses/E-Learning Animation IT Courses/Maya 3D Animation less

The best thing is you learn the basic drawing and perspective first. From any reputed art school or college. Otherwise, only technical knowledge wouldn't make you creative or unique. After the underlying sense of art is grown, every awesome thing is possible whether it's commercial or creative .thanks... ...more

The best thing is you learn the basic drawing and perspective first. From any reputed art school or college. Otherwise, only technical knowledge wouldn't make you creative or unique. After the underlying sense of art is grown, every awesome thing is possible whether it's commercial or creative .
thanks a lot, Riyank

take care

.......Tanmoy

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Answered on 05/11/2019 Tuition

Please Learn CA for better opportunities, and you'll get the coaching class in Bhawanipore, Kolkata
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Answered on 05/11/2019 Art and Creativity/Drawing/Intermediate

Just try to observe the drawing pattern and colour minutely as per your reference. If you're a beginner, you can make graphs on your canvas/paper. Otherwise, you can also trace, hope you'll find the essential things in my answer. I'm uploading one painting done by my student, you'll understand well,... ...more

Just try to observe the drawing pattern and colour minutely as per your reference. If you're a beginner, you can make graphs on your canvas/paper. Otherwise, you can also trace, hope you'll find the essential things in my answer. I'm uploading one painting done by my student, you'll understand well, thank you:)

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Tanmoy Majumder describes himself as Teacher:Art and Craft,Painting,Drawing,BFA,MFA,Applied Art,Graphics-Printmaking, Art History,NET etc. He conducts classes in Advanced Placement Tests Coaching, Art and Craft and BFA Tuition. Tanmoy is located in Dum Dum, Kolkata. Tanmoy takes at students Home, Regular Classes- at his Home and Online Classes- via online medium. He has 17 years of teaching experience . Tanmoy is pursuing PhD in Visual Arts from Rabindra Bharati University. Tanmoy has completed Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA - BVA) from Rabindra Bharati University in 2008 and Master of Fine Arts (MFA - MVA) from Visva-Bharati University in 2010. He is well versed in Bengali, Hindi and English. Tanmoy has got 4 reviews till now with 100% positive feedback.

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