Harshal Godbole photo

Harshal Godbole

B.E. (IT)

Dombivili West, Kalyan, India- 421201.

UrbanPro students 9 Students (9 from UrbanPro)

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Overview

I am a java professional with more then 4 years of work experience and oracle certified java programmer.

I have experienced in teaching core java, advanced, struts, spring, hibernate, java, j2ee, android , c, c++, data structure and sql.

Demo Class

No

Class Availability

ScheduleDays

Before 9am
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
9am-Noon
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Noon-3pm
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
3pm-6pm
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
After 6pm
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
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Languages Spoken

Hindi, Marathi, English

Education

Bachelor of Engineering (B.E.) from RGPV in 2011.

Address

Dombivili West, Kalyan, India- 421201.

C Language Classes Overview

C Language Classes

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in C Language Classes

5

View all Classes

Reviews (9)

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5.0 from 9 reviews

5.0/59
S

- by Shrey Shrivastava

attended Core Java training

posted on 16 Aug, 2016

"He is a great teacher. Had a great experience learning from him. Highly Recommended!! "

A

- by Anjela

attended Java Certification Classes

posted on 17 Jun, 2016

"Sir has more then 4 years of experience in Java Development field. he also share his working experience with us. i'll surely recommend others. "

P

- by Pratibha Anand

attended Core Java training

posted on 28 Apr, 2016

"His training is good and simple, I like the way he explains about Java concepts it's very easy to understand .he has good technical skill and teaching skill as well :-) "

M

- by Mrs Bindu

attended Java Training

posted on 22 Mar, 2016

"a very good teacher. He's well versed in Java. Has lots of patience and is ready to teach a topic again & again if u have doubt. "

Have you attended the class of Harshal ? Write a Review

Lessons (1)

Programing Languages Learning Tricks

You want to learn that new language or library or framework as soon as possible, right? That’s understandable. Fortunately, there are a handful of tips that can help you to better retain all of that...

28/10/2016
0 0
0

Answers by Harshal (10)

"What is a stream?" in   IT Courses/Programming Languages/C Language

The term stream is an abstraction of a construct that allows you to send or receive an unknown number of bytes. The metaphor is a stream of water. You take the data as it comes, or send it as needed. Contrast this to an array, for example, which has a fixed, known length. Examples where streams are used include reading and writing to files, receiving or sending data across an external connection. However the term stream is generic and says nothing about the specific implementation.

0
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0

"What is a singleton class and when do you use it?" in   IT Courses/Java

One reason that tends to come up over and over again on the internets is that of a "logging" class (which you mentioned). In this case, a Singleton can be used instead of a single instance of a class because a logging class usually needs to be used over and over again ad nauseam by every class in a project. If every class uses this logging class, dependency injection becomes cumbersome. Logging is a specific example of an "acceptable" Singleton because it doesn't affect the execution of your code. Disable logging, code execution remains the same. Enable it, same same. Misko puts it in the following way in Root Cause of Singletons, "The information here flows one way: From your application into the logger. Even though loggers are global state, since no information flows from loggers into your application, loggers are acceptable." Singleton candidate must satisfy three requirements: controls concurrent access to a shared resource. access to the resource will be requested from multiple, disparate parts of the system. there can be only one object. If your proposed Singleton has only one or two of these requirements, a redesign is almost always the correct option. For example, a printer spooler is unlikely to be called from more than one place (the Print menu), so you can use mutexes to solve the concurrent access problem. A simple logger is the most obvious example of a possibly-valid Singleton, but this can change with more complex logging schemes.

0
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0

"What is JavaBean?" in   IT Courses/Java

A JavaBean is just a standard All properties private (use getters/setters) A public no-argument constructor Implements Serializable. That's it. It's just a convention. Lots of libraries depend on it though.... With respect to Serializable, from the API documentation: Serializability of a class is enabled by the class implementing the java.io.Serializable interface. Classes that do not implement this interface will not have any of their state serialized or deserialized. All subtypes of a serializable class are themselves serializable. The serialization interface has no methods or fields and serves only to identify the semantics of being serializable. In other words, serializable objects can be written to streams, and hence files, object databases, anything really. Also, there is no syntactic difference between a JavaBean and another class -- a class defines a JavaBean if it follows the standards. There is a term for it because the standard allows libraries to programmatically do things with class instances you define in a predefined way. For example, if a library wants to stream any object you pass into it, it knows it can because your object is serializable (assuming the lib requires your objects be proper JavaBeans).

0
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0

"Is there any difference between Serializalble and Externalizable interface?" in   IT Courses/Java

by implementating java.io.Serializable, you get "automatic" serialization capability for objects of your class. No need to implement any other logic, it'll just work. The Java runtime will use reflection to figure out how to marshal and unmarshal your objects. In earlier version of Java, reflection was very slow, and so serializaing large object graphs (e.g. in client-server RMI applications) was a bit of a performance problem. To handle this situation, the java.io.Externalizable interface was provided, which is like java.io.Serializable but with custom-written mechanisms to perform the marshalling and unmarshalling functions (you need to implement readExternal and writeExternal methods on your class). This gives you the means to get around the reflection performance bottleneck. In recent versions of Java (1.3 onwards, certainly) the performance of reflection is vastly better than it used to be, and so this is much less of a problem. I suspect you'd be hard-pressed to get a meaningful benefit from Externalizable with a modern JVM. Also, the built-in Java serialization mechanism isn't the only one, you can get third-party replacements, such as JBoss Serialization, which is considerably quicker, and is a drop-in replacement for the default. A big downside of Externalizable is that you have to maintain this logic yourself - if you add, remove or change a field in your class, you have to change your writeExternal/readExternal methods to account for it. In summary, Externalizable is a relic of the Java 1.1 days. There's really no need for it any more.

0
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0

"What is meant by "bit masking"?" in   IT Courses/Programming Languages/C Language

Bit masking means selecting only certain bits from byte(s) that might have many bits set. To examine some bits of a byte, the byte is bitwise “ANDed” with a mask that is a number consisting of only those bits of interest. For instance, to look at the one’s digit (rightmost digit) of the variable flags, you bitwise AND it with a mask of one (the bitwise AND operator in C is &): flags & 1; To set the bits of interest, the number is bitwise “ORed” with the bit mask (the bitwise OR operator in C is |). For instance, you could set the one’s digit of flags like so: flags = flags | 1; Or, equivalently, you could set it like this: flags |= 1; To clear the bits of interest, the number is bitwise ANDed with the one’s complement of the bit mask. The “one’s complement” of a number is the number with all its one bits changed to zeros and all its zero bits changed to ones. The one’s complement operator in C is ~. For instance, you could clear the one’s digit of flags like so: flags = flags & ~1; Or, equivalently, you could clear it like this: flags &= ~1;

0
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0

Harshal address

x
C Language Classes

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in C Language Classes

5

C++ Language classes

Proficiency level taught

Advanced C++

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in C++ Language classes

4

Java Training Classes

Teaches

Struts

Certification training offered

Yes

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Java Training Classes

5

Servlet Training

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Servlet Training

4

Mobile App Development Training

Teaches following

Android Application Development

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Mobile App Development Training

3

Chess Coaching classes

Class Location

Student's Home

Tutor's Home

Years of Experience in Chess Coaching classes

8

"What is a stream?" in   IT Courses/Programming Languages/C Language

The term stream is an abstraction of a construct that allows you to send or receive an unknown number of bytes. The metaphor is a stream of water. You take the data as it comes, or send it as needed. Contrast this to an array, for example, which has a fixed, known length. Examples where streams are used include reading and writing to files, receiving or sending data across an external connection. However the term stream is generic and says nothing about the specific implementation.

0
|
0

"What is a singleton class and when do you use it?" in   IT Courses/Java

One reason that tends to come up over and over again on the internets is that of a "logging" class (which you mentioned). In this case, a Singleton can be used instead of a single instance of a class because a logging class usually needs to be used over and over again ad nauseam by every class in a project. If every class uses this logging class, dependency injection becomes cumbersome. Logging is a specific example of an "acceptable" Singleton because it doesn't affect the execution of your code. Disable logging, code execution remains the same. Enable it, same same. Misko puts it in the following way in Root Cause of Singletons, "The information here flows one way: From your application into the logger. Even though loggers are global state, since no information flows from loggers into your application, loggers are acceptable." Singleton candidate must satisfy three requirements: controls concurrent access to a shared resource. access to the resource will be requested from multiple, disparate parts of the system. there can be only one object. If your proposed Singleton has only one or two of these requirements, a redesign is almost always the correct option. For example, a printer spooler is unlikely to be called from more than one place (the Print menu), so you can use mutexes to solve the concurrent access problem. A simple logger is the most obvious example of a possibly-valid Singleton, but this can change with more complex logging schemes.

0
|
0

"What is JavaBean?" in   IT Courses/Java

A JavaBean is just a standard All properties private (use getters/setters) A public no-argument constructor Implements Serializable. That's it. It's just a convention. Lots of libraries depend on it though.... With respect to Serializable, from the API documentation: Serializability of a class is enabled by the class implementing the java.io.Serializable interface. Classes that do not implement this interface will not have any of their state serialized or deserialized. All subtypes of a serializable class are themselves serializable. The serialization interface has no methods or fields and serves only to identify the semantics of being serializable. In other words, serializable objects can be written to streams, and hence files, object databases, anything really. Also, there is no syntactic difference between a JavaBean and another class -- a class defines a JavaBean if it follows the standards. There is a term for it because the standard allows libraries to programmatically do things with class instances you define in a predefined way. For example, if a library wants to stream any object you pass into it, it knows it can because your object is serializable (assuming the lib requires your objects be proper JavaBeans).

0
|
0

"Is there any difference between Serializalble and Externalizable interface?" in   IT Courses/Java

by implementating java.io.Serializable, you get "automatic" serialization capability for objects of your class. No need to implement any other logic, it'll just work. The Java runtime will use reflection to figure out how to marshal and unmarshal your objects. In earlier version of Java, reflection was very slow, and so serializaing large object graphs (e.g. in client-server RMI applications) was a bit of a performance problem. To handle this situation, the java.io.Externalizable interface was provided, which is like java.io.Serializable but with custom-written mechanisms to perform the marshalling and unmarshalling functions (you need to implement readExternal and writeExternal methods on your class). This gives you the means to get around the reflection performance bottleneck. In recent versions of Java (1.3 onwards, certainly) the performance of reflection is vastly better than it used to be, and so this is much less of a problem. I suspect you'd be hard-pressed to get a meaningful benefit from Externalizable with a modern JVM. Also, the built-in Java serialization mechanism isn't the only one, you can get third-party replacements, such as JBoss Serialization, which is considerably quicker, and is a drop-in replacement for the default. A big downside of Externalizable is that you have to maintain this logic yourself - if you add, remove or change a field in your class, you have to change your writeExternal/readExternal methods to account for it. In summary, Externalizable is a relic of the Java 1.1 days. There's really no need for it any more.

0
|
0

"What is meant by "bit masking"?" in   IT Courses/Programming Languages/C Language

Bit masking means selecting only certain bits from byte(s) that might have many bits set. To examine some bits of a byte, the byte is bitwise “ANDed” with a mask that is a number consisting of only those bits of interest. For instance, to look at the one’s digit (rightmost digit) of the variable flags, you bitwise AND it with a mask of one (the bitwise AND operator in C is &): flags & 1; To set the bits of interest, the number is bitwise “ORed” with the bit mask (the bitwise OR operator in C is |). For instance, you could set the one’s digit of flags like so: flags = flags | 1; Or, equivalently, you could set it like this: flags |= 1; To clear the bits of interest, the number is bitwise ANDed with the one’s complement of the bit mask. The “one’s complement” of a number is the number with all its one bits changed to zeros and all its zero bits changed to ones. The one’s complement operator in C is ~. For instance, you could clear the one’s digit of flags like so: flags = flags & ~1; Or, equivalently, you could clear it like this: flags &= ~1;

0
|
0
Load More
Programing Languages Learning Tricks

You want to learn that new language or library or framework as soon as possible, right? That’s understandable. Fortunately, there are a handful of tips that can help you to better retain all of that...

28/10/2016
0 0
0

Harshal Godbole conducts classes in C Language, C++ Language and Chess Coaching. Harshal is located in Dombivili West, Kalyan. Harshal takes at students Home and Regular Classes- at his Home. He has 8 years of teaching experience . Harshal has completed Bachelor of Engineering (B.E.) from RGPV in 2011. He is well versed in Hindi, Marathi and English. Harshal has got 9 reviews till now with 100% positive feedback.

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